GOOD

GOOD Pictures: Brea Souders Investigates Her Roots

Photographs exploring Souders' childhood home and her mixed European ancestry.

GOOD Pictures features work by a new photographer each week, with a focus on up-and-coming artists. It is curated by Stephanie Gonot and Jennifer Mizgata.

The enigmatic images above are from two sets of photographs by Brooklyn-based photographer Brea Souders. The first set, simply titled New Work, is a series of images she made using various objects from her parents' home. The second, Counterforms, is Brea's investigation into her mixed European ancestry. Curators Ariel Shanberg and Akemi Hiatt described Brea's work beautifully:


Using fabric, mirrors, magazine cutouts, and fragmented representations of her own body, Souders composes surreal and dreamlike scenes which oscillate between flatness and illusionary depth. In her efforts to establish a legitimate connection with her personal ancestry, she both utilizes and contradicts the photographs traditional role in preserving memory and connecting lineage. The result is a seductive, yet unyielding surface.

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The two sets of images are displayed on Brea's website, but I have blended them together in to showcase the graphic quality of her work. Visit her site for more alluring images.

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