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Photo by William Bossen on Unsplash

The arctic is warming at twice the rate as the rest of the world, which means the sea ice is shrinking at a rapid rate. The arctic has its lowest amount of sea ice since scientists began monitoring it by satellite in the 1970s. It begs the question, can't we just refreeze the ice? The answer might actually be, "yes."

A team of Indonesian designers want to produce iceberg-making submarines. The team, led by architect Faris Rajak Kotahatuhaha, plans on creating a submergible vessel, which sounds a little bit like an elaborate ice cube tray. The submarine sinks below the surface of the sea, filling up a cavity with seawater. The salt is removed, and the water is frozen using a "giant freezing machine." The result is 16-foot thick and 82-foot wide hexagonal icebergs, which are then released into the sea. Why the hexagon shape? It allows the icebergs to interlock with each other, forming larger masses of ice. Each iceberg would take a month to create. The idea was recently named runner-up in an international design competition for sustainable ideas.

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The Planet


Canadian biologist Catherine La Farge spends a lot of time poking around the edge of a glacier on Ellesmere Island in the far northern reaches of her country. As the ice recedes some dozen feet a year now, she has collected scores of samples of what has been locked there for the four hundred years since the Little Ice Age—ancient mosses—and she recently accomplished what seems like science fiction: she brought some of it back to life.

From the National Post:

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Arctic Drilling Getting a Critical Second Look

Cold feet? Yeah, you'd have to guess so.

Cold feet? Yeah, you'd have to guess so.

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Video: Watch Our Planet's Ice Disappear

Watch this incredible video of the "recent" history of ice on our planet, from its long retreat after the Ice Age to the current rapid big melt.

A couple of engineers at the Zurich University of Applied Sciences created this visualization of shrinking glaciers, polar ice caps, and ice shelves, starting back 21,000 years ago (at the peak of the last Ice Age), and ending 1,000 years from now.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C3Jwnp-Z3yE

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In Alaska, As Goes the Ice, So Goes the Food

The Arctic food web is unraveling as the ice melts. An interactive animation shows you what happens when even the smallest species disappears.

The cover article of the current issue of OnEarth is a terrific, if somewhat depressing, must read. (Is there a term yet for must-read long reads?) Bruce Barcott plunges into the frigid, but melting, Arctic Seas, and comes out with a story of how the oh-so-fragile food web of the upper latitudes is starting to come undone.

Perhaps as good as the article itself is the accompanying material online. An interactive, animated graphic invites you to click on various Arctic species to see what would happen if they disappeared. By watching the impacts on other species—even humans—it becomes as clear as an Alaska stream how interconnected the aquatic ecosystem is, and what a severe threat warming is on the entire Arctic way of life. Click here or on the image below to toy around with the web.

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Yes, Even the Great Groundhog's Day Blizzard of 2011 Has Ties to Climate Change

Another massive winter storm that pummels the country means another occasion to explain climate change's connection to weather.

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