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The $10,000 College Degree? It Might Be Coming to Florida

It looks like Texas Governor Rick Perry's call for a $10,000 college degree idea is faring better than his failed Presidential bid. In 2011,...


It looks like Texas Governor Rick Perry's idea of a $10,000 college degree is faring better than his failed Presidential bid. In 2011, Perry challenged his state's higher education institution to cap costs at $10,000 and sure enough, at SXSW 2012 three schools announced plans to do just that—one bachelor's degree from Texas A&M at San Antonio even clocked in at a mere $9,700. Now Florida governor Rick Scott is jumping on board the $10,000 degree bandwagon. On Monday he issued a similar challenge to his state's colleges and universities.

So how much do Florida's students currently spend? The average cost for a bachelor's degree at one of the state's community colleges currently costs $13,264 per year and in-state residents pay roughly $24,000 to attend one of Florida's public universities. But, according to the Orlando Sentinel, Scott—like many governors—has pressed higher education leaders to reign in costs so that college is more affordable for Florida's students, thus creating a pipeline of educated workers for the state's economy.

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American Students Are Paying More Than Ever For College (Again)

Over the past five years, the average published price at a four-year university has increased by 27 percent.


We've all heard the saying that the only guarantees in life are death and taxes. Well, here's another truism: Every year the cost of college goes up. Over the past five years, the average published price at a four-year university has increased by 27 percent. According to the College Board's annual Trends in College Pricing report, costs at these "institutions rose more rapidly between 2002-03 and 2012-13 than over either of the two preceding decades."

It's not that schools are trying to gouge students. Instead, the report notes that revenue shortages—think of all the reports you hear of state budget cuts to higher education—instead of wild spending on campus are behind the rapid rise in public college prices. And yes, prices are up again for the 2012-2013 school year, too. The average published tuition and fees for in-state students attending four-year public colleges and universities jumped 4.8 percent—increasing an average of $399 dollars to $8,655 in 2012‐2012, and the costs of room and board rose 3.7 percent—up $399 dollars to $9,205. Combined with the cost of books, supplies, and other expenses the sticker price to attend an in-state public college is up 3.8 percent to a new record $22,261.

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Savvy College Student Pays His Tuition with Money from Rebates

Deal chaser Jonathan Hood gives new meaning to "free after rebate."

Ever buy something that comes with a "free after rebate" offer and then you forget to mail it in before the deadline? Jonathan Hood, a doctoral student at Auburn University in Alabama's never had that problem. In fact, he's so savvy at the rebate game that he paid his tuition this semester with money he got back from his purchases.

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How a National Alliance of Community Colleges Could Move the Country Forward

Rebuilding America's Middle Class plans to advocate for workforce development, innovation, and affordability at community colleges.


With an increasing number of recent high school graduates—and more experienced workers seeking to brush up on their skills—looking for affordable education options, community colleges have become a key to educating the workforce of the future. But despite increased demand—13 million students a year attend community college, up 9 percent since 2006—the recession has slashed community college budgets. Now, those schools are banding together to form Rebuilding America’s Middle Class, a nonprofit national coalition that plans to advocate for increased support for community colleges.

Students' ability to earn an affordable professional certificate or degree through a community college education is a critical part of building America's middle class. The average student can earn a professional certificate in a year for as little as $1,500, a crucial factor for the large number of low-income students of color who attend community colleges. Staying in school to earn an associate's degree or enough credits to transfer to a four-year school costs the average student between $7,000 and $8,000—less than half the cost for the same classes at most public four-year colleges. And those certificates and college credits qualify students for higher paying jobs.

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New College Cost Comparison Tool Helps Students See Potential Student Loan Debt

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and the Department of Education want to educate students about the financial implications of college.


The cost of college is up a whopping 439 percent since 1982, and the average student graduates with $25,000 in loans. Given that college graduates earn more than their high school peers, that might not seem like a bad investment, but if a graduate can't find a job that pays enough to meet the monthly student loan bill, that degree can start to feel like a burden. For current high school seniors pondering college acceptance letters, calculating how much they could owe in student loans after graduating from a particular school is a smart move to make.

As part of the recently launched Know Before You Owe project, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and the Department of Education have developed a new interactive cost comparison tool to help students evaluate the costs and risks involved in paying for school. The tool, which is still in beta, lets students enter up to three schools they're interested in and whether they're going for an associate's degree or a bachelor's degree.

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For Many California Students, Harvard Is Now Cheaper Than State Schools

A 300 percent increase in tuition and lackluster financial aid from state schools is making elite private universities look more appealing.


Thanks to a 300 percent increase in tuition over the past decade, California college students have a tradition of protesting education budgets—in recent years they've marched on freeways and held sit-ins on campus. Faced with a proposed 21 percent tuition increase for the next school year, tens of thousands of angry students marched on the state capitol on Monday to demand that lawmakers fully fund higher education.

As the state has cut billions of dollars from education budgets over the past few years, California's universities have begun admitting more out-of-state students, who pay triple the tuition. And like many other states, they've shifted a larger burden of the operating costs on to students. That means that increasing numbers of low-income and middle-class students are being priced out of state school.

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