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As you go about your day, you’re often faced with the decision of how to get from Point A to Point B in the most efficient and easiest way possible. On the street, you likely have many choices from your own vehicle to biking, and it’s people like Emily Stapleton and Eric Gilliland who hope you choose the latter.

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People Are Awesome: See What Happens When a Bunch of City Kids Climb a Mountain

Kids feel accomplished and the sense of great wonder and joy they took from being in nature for the first time.

In 1999, I met Emmanuel Durant, Jr., a bright, active nine-year-old boy who lived down the street from me in a rough patch of Southeast Washington, D.C. We played basketball together. I helped him with his homework; he helped me with my art projects. Even after I moved out of D.C., we remained close, and I would come back to visit Emmanuel and his family every couple of years.

Despite his family's many struggles, Emmanuel became a success story. He was the first in his family to graduate high school; he was a generous, reflective young man who was engaged to marry his longtime sweetheart; and had just signed on to begin training as a firefighter. Tragically, on New Year's Eve 2009, Emmanuel was shot and killed while protecting his sister and baby nephews during a robbery.

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Washington, D.C. Offers $12,000 to People Who Move Near Work

So you want to live near work, but moving is too much of a hassle? Perhaps it would be more appealing if it came with $12,000 dollars.

Sure, in a perfect world, we'd all live near work. A short commute saves time and money and makes it easy to bike or walk to the office. But in the real world there are lots of factors affecting where we choose to live, and work is only one of them.

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Michelle Rhee to Join Florida Governor-elect Rick Scott's Education Team

Michelle Rhee leaves the ranks of the unemployed. Now we know where the prominent education reformer is headed.

With former chancellor Michelle Rhee's departure from the Washington, D.C., public schools, speculation ran wild about where she would end up next. Would she head to New Jersey to administer Newark's $100 million Facebook bequest? Would she replace outgoing Chicago Public Schools chief Ron Huberman?

The guessing game can officially come to an end. Rhee's leaving the ranks of the unemployed and heading to Florida to join the education transition team of Republican Governor-elect Rick Scott.

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Verizon Asks Permission to Stop Delivering Phone Books

Two more states and the District are close to abandoning the unnecessary, wasteful paper phone book.


Good news: Two more states are close to abandoning the unrequested phone book.

Verizon, the largest provider of landline phones in the Washington region, is asking state regulators for permission to stop delivering the residential white pages in Virginia and Maryland.

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In 1925, a 22-year-old busboy slipped three poems to acclaimed poet Vachel Lindsay while he was dining at the Wardman Park Hotel in Washington, D.C. Vachel read the poems aloud to his audience later that night noting the “negro busboy poet” author. Reporters wanting to meet the young poet besieged him the next morning, or so the legend goes. Langston Hughes had been discovered.

It was a hostile time and place for African American artists, writers and intellectuals. In 1925, when Hughes and Lindsay had their encounter, Jim Crow was alive and well in Washington, D.C. and the literary establishment was overwhelmingly white and male.

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