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Fake news is rampant on the internet. Unscrupulous websites are encouraged to create misleading stories about political figures because they get clicks.

A study published by Science Advances found that elderly conservatives are, by far, the worst spearders of fake news. Ultra conservatives over the age of 65 shared about seven times more fake information on social media than moderates and super liberals during the 2016 election.

Get ready for things to get worse.

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Culture

Last week, GOOD reported on an Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) morning briefing sent to Department of Justice employees which contained a link to a white nationalist blog post.

The link was to a story attacking immigration judges published on VDare, a site that the Southern Poverty Law Center calls an "anti-immigration hate website" that "regularly publishes articles by prominent white nationalists, race scientists and anti-Semites."

A spokesperson for the EOIR responded to the incident by saying "The Department of Justice condemns anti-Semitism in the strongest terms."

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Politics

GOOD Voter Guide to the May 21st Los Angeles Election

Young Angelenos have compiled this progressives’ voter guide in partnership with GOOD Magazine for the Los Angeles general election on May 21st.

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Young Angelenos, a small group of volunteer citizen activists, envision LA as a productive, prosperous town with citizens who are engaged, informed and excited to advocate for progressive public policy.

That’s the dream. With that in mind, Young Angelenos have compiled this progressives’ voter guide in partnership with GOOD Magazine for the Los Angeles general election on May 21st. On that Tuesday, we’ll vote for the Mayor, four members of the City Council, and a host of other characters who will dictate the future of Los Angeles.

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Articles

Why Is There So Little Money in Politics? Also: Why So Much?

Academics are trying to sort out whether corporate political donations make economic sense, and it turns out to be more complicated than you think.

A New York Times column from Eduardo Porter considers money in American politics at a historically interesting time—some academics have long argued that there isn't enough money in our political process, considering what that money could potentially buy:

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Articles

Whatever You Do, Don't Call Michele Bachmann Crazy

If you hate her politics, you should really hate Newsweek's "crazy-eyed" Bachmann cover, too.

Another election, another female candidate, another sexist Newsweek cover. The latest issue of the magazine features a "crazy-eyed" Michele Bachmann, labeled the "Queen of Rage." Everyone from conservative writer Michelle Malkin to Planned Parenthood president Cecile Richards have rightly denounced the cover for its portrayal of women in power as "lunatics," "crackpots," and "batshit crazy."

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Articles

Can You Have Your Change and Progress Too?

Voters who care about education reform have a job to do after they leave the ballot box tomorrow.

Voters who care about education reform have a job to do after they leave the ballot box tomorrow: Make it clear to new leaders that momentum and progress must continue under new leadership.

Elections can be hard on education, but they don’t have to be. Much is made of the instability wrought by electoral changes in leadership. It conditions an unproductive hunker-down-and-wait-it-out response that virtually guarantees no real reform will last. However, a closer look challenges this response and suggests how the 2010 elections can mark the year our nation has not only its change, but its progress, too.

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Articles