GOOD

8 Animals That Have Better Resumes Than You

A collection of creatures that prove that you don't have to be human to serve society.

As you contemplate your navel, your flaccid body splayed out along the edge of the sofa, take a slow look around the living room and allow yourself some small comfort in your pet, surely the laziest member of the household - even lazier than you, maybe. Look at him sleeping over there – no responsibility, not a care in the world. No job. Recent studies have shown that 90 percent of pets are lazy as hell, just taking up space and eating your food. But do they feel fulfilled? Can they really be happy with this lethargic lifestyle?

Maybe it’s time to re-think your strategy, as far as this whole job thing goes. Instead of pursuing your own professional dreams, think of little Fifi, life ticking by in dog years, who could be out there in the real world making an honest living. So the next time you catch your lil’ buddy napping, pull him up to the computer screen, and inspire him with this list of hard-working animals on the hustle.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Forced Friends: Want a Job? Give Up Your Facebook Password

It turns out that online privacy is yet another casualty of the recession.


Concerns about the safety of Facebook profiles are valid, especially as the company grows and people share more information on the site. Facebook has had frightening breaches of user trust in the past, and some questions about where its loyalties lie—with consumers or with corporations—remain unanswered. Nobody can predict whether Facebook will end up taking advantage of the information provided by the millions of people who log into it every hour. But while Facebook itself waffles between creepy and benevolent, it turns out some people are using the site to get downright evil when it comes to online privacy.

An in-depth report from MSNBC reveals numerous documented instances of American colleges and employers demanding that students, employees, and applicants open up their Facebook profiles for review. Tecca.com reported last year on a police department in North Carolina that asked people applying for a clerical job, "Do you have any web page accounts such as Facebook, Myspace, etc.? If so, list your username and password." The Maryland Department of Corrections also asked applicants to hand over their passwords, until an ACLU complaint killed that practice. Still, some applicants report being asked in interviews to log into their Facebook profiles and allow the interviewer to look over their shoulder while they click around their photos and wall posts.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles