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According to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, breast augmentation is the most popular form of cosmetic surgery in the country. Some women choose to get breast implants for cosmetic reasons, while others use them to rebuild after undergoing mastectomies for breast cancer. In 2018, 310,000 breast augmentations were performed, which is a 4% increase from 2017. However, it comes with many risks that women night not be aware of.

Breast implants aren't permanent and need to be removed or replaced every eight to ten years, yet the FDA says 20% of women have to get their implants removed sooner because of complications. Some complications can include severe muscle and joint pain, scarring, weakness, cognitive difficulties, and rupture. There's even a term for it – "breast implant illness." As bad as those symptoms sound, they can also be worse; 573 people developed a rare form of blood cancer because of their implants, and 33 people have died.

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Health

Are We Getting Closer to Repealing the Ban on Gay Blood Donors?

Many GOOD community members pointed out that they couldn’t give blood even if they wanted to, because they're gay.

After the mass shooting in Aurora, Colorado, GOOD’s Andrew Price wrote an article suggesting that one meaningful response to the tragedy is to donate blood. The idea resonated with several people in the GOOD community and prompted an important conversation. Many commenters pointed out that they couldn’t give blood even if they wanted to, because they're gay.

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If there’s one thing you’d think American medical establishment would have a grip on, it would be keeping blood inside you. But you’d be mistaken!

An inexpensive, simple drug is helping save American soldiers in Afghanistan and Iraq. Tranexamic acid slows blood flow, giving emergency medical personnel more time to stabilize patients and treat injuries.

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Beware of Whole Grain Inflation

Subway offers sandwiches on 9-grain bread. You can find 10-grain, 12-grain, and even 15-grain breads in supermarkets. What do all these claims mean?

Subway offers sandwiches on 9-grain bread. Krispy Kreme has multigrain donuts and Dunkin Donuts offers multigrain bagels. You can find 10-grain, 12-grain, and even 15-grain breads in supermarkets. As Rob Beschizza wrote on BoingBoing, "The shelf seems to be graining under all that whole grain goodness."

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Tastes Like Nanotechnology

A small step towards federal oversight for the safety of some very small particles that are making their way into foods.


Nanofilters can remove viruses from milk and nanomaterials could soon block cholesterol in canola oil from entering our bloodstream. They can alter the texture of ice cream. Tiny particles in chicken feed can latch onto Campylobacter jejuni and keep the bacteria from getting into our chicken nuggets. Tiny silica spheres could be used to detect the presence of the harmful E. coli 0157 bacteria in organic sprouts.

These nano-innovations have been heralded as a defining feature of the future of our food, but until yesterday, there had been little federal oversight, despite the toxicological risks associated with shrinking materials and adding them to the environment. Moreover, the information remains in the hands of food and agriculture companies.

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Alcohol Counts, Just Not When it Comes to Calorie Counting

Not on tap for beer, wine, or fruity mixed drinks: Calorie counts.


Americans reportedly drink about 2.5 gallons of pure alcohol per person per year, according the World Health Organization's latest data (PDF). That’s like doing 410 shots of 100-proof vodka over the course of the year, or slurping up about one pint 11 pints of Budweiser every day.*

If this sounds like a lot, it is—and drinking all sorts of beverages are certainly one of the many contributing factors to obesity.

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