GOOD

Are We Getting Closer to Repealing the Ban on Gay Blood Donors?

Many GOOD community members pointed out that they couldn’t give blood even if they wanted to, because they're gay.

After the mass shooting in Aurora, Colorado, GOOD’s Andrew Price wrote an article suggesting that one meaningful response to the tragedy is to donate blood. The idea resonated with several people in the GOOD community and prompted an important conversation. Many commenters pointed out that they couldn’t give blood even if they wanted to, because they're gay.

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If there’s one thing you’d think American medical establishment would have a grip on, it would be keeping blood inside you. But you’d be mistaken!

An inexpensive, simple drug is helping save American soldiers in Afghanistan and Iraq. Tranexamic acid slows blood flow, giving emergency medical personnel more time to stabilize patients and treat injuries.

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Fear the Frankenfish: Beneath the Gills of the Genetically Engineered Salmon

A quick-developing, nutritious, cheap fish with no negative health or environmental impacts? Many scientists say it sounds good—almost too good.


Government documents uncovered this December revealed a fishy situation: In 2009, Canadian authorities discovered a new strain of a deadly fish flu, Infectious Salmon Anaemia, at a Prince Edward Island aquaculture research facility. ISA outbreaks always mean trouble—the disease decimates fish populations across the globe—but this case is leaving an especially sour taste in foodies’ mouths.

That’s because the research facility was owned by AquaBounty Technologies, a biotech company that creates salmon eggs to hatch genetically engineered fish. AquaBounty never released information about the outbreak to the public, despite the fact that its GE salmon is poised to become the first transgenic animal to be approved for human consumption.

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Tastes Like Nanotechnology

A small step towards federal oversight for the safety of some very small particles that are making their way into foods.


Nanofilters can remove viruses from milk and nanomaterials could soon block cholesterol in canola oil from entering our bloodstream. They can alter the texture of ice cream. Tiny particles in chicken feed can latch onto Campylobacter jejuni and keep the bacteria from getting into our chicken nuggets. Tiny silica spheres could be used to detect the presence of the harmful E. coli 0157 bacteria in organic sprouts.

These nano-innovations have been heralded as a defining feature of the future of our food, but until yesterday, there had been little federal oversight, despite the toxicological risks associated with shrinking materials and adding them to the environment. Moreover, the information remains in the hands of food and agriculture companies.

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OMG GMOs! How Can You Tell If Your Produce Is Genetically Modified?

The new AquAdvantage salmon is forcing a public debate about the safety of genetically modified foods, and what the public should know about them.

If you walk into a grocery store, how can you tell if something's been genetically modified? The current labeling is neither obvious nor uniform, but that could be changing.

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Did Pom Wonderful Buy Morgan Spurlock's Silence?

Do pomegranates really help with heart disease and erectile health? The evidence isn't clear and it's too bad Morgan Spurlock didn't let us know that.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ruArPIWQ_M4

Morgan Spurlock—the entertainer who once fed himself only McDonald’s for a month, who crisscrossed the dessert in search of Osama bin Laden, and who espouses “Raw for 30 Days,” a diet that can supposedly reverse diabetes—has a new stunt he’d like you to watch.

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