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In the Trenches of Life and Death

Both transcendent and troubling, Farewell to Hollywood documents the final days of a remarkable young filmmaker’s struggle with cancer

Reggie Nicholson

When we first meet Reggie Nicholson, co-director and central subject of the astonishing and troubling documentary Farewell to Hollywood, she's 19 years old and she's already dead. Her body has already been cremated, in fact, and the film’s opening scene is of her ashes being prepared for what appears to be an impromptu burial. Curiously, the group handling her burial is not her family, who we’re informed via voiceover were not invited to the funeral, as per Nicholson’s last wishes. Due to the slightly confusing nonlinear narrative, we’re not even sure her parents have even been informed their daughter has passed away.

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What Inspires You: The Wildlife Photographer

As a wildlife photographer, Kristin Mosher specializes in documenting wild chimps to help tell their stories to audiences around the world.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xGMZHmE-nFw

This post is in partnership with Disneynature's Chimpanzee, on Disney Blu-ray Combo Pack & HD Digital August 21

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What Inspires You: The Wildlife Videographer

An acclaimed filmmaker and videographer, Bill Wallauer has spent 20 years documenting chimps in the wild. See what inspires his work.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XZVFYhjKpuA;

This post is in partnership with Disneynature's Chimpanzee, on Disney Blu-ray Combo Pack & HD Digital August 21

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'As a Gay Man': Coming Out, Quinto-Style

Will actor Zachary Quinto's low-key confession in New York magazine usher in a new era of casual coming-out moments?


Actor Zachary Quinto just came out as gay—not via a proclamation on a magazine cover, not in a curated press statement, but by using one little phrase in an interview: "As a gay man..."

Yesterday, New York magazine ran a profile of the Heroes actor that included questions about Angels in America and his producer role in Margin Call, plus a casual confession of Quinto's sexuality, a qualifier as natural as where he was born or what color hair he has. Among the spate of celebrities who have come out in the last 20 years, this is an unusual course to take. Ellen DeGeneres famously came out on her own sitcom, in an episode that attracted more than 42 million viewers. Country singer Chely Wright staked out the cover of People to make her announcement, and followed that up with a tell-all memoir. After years of speculation, singer Ricky Martin wrote on his website that he was a "fortunate homosexual man."

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Something Doesn’t Add Up The Maddening Math of Crime Shows

Crunching the numbers on a crime show that’s supposed to be about math


The former CBS show Numb3rs, otherwise known as CSI-Math or “the show with the number three in its title,” is one of those series that seems like it was never actually on, that it came into this world already in syndication. You can usually find a rerun on at around 3 in the morning. I turn to it at the end of the night, when all is dark and the demands of the day have been silenced. I find the show both unwatchable and mesmerizing. No matter how much I tell myself not to look at it, there will be those moments of intractable curiosity when I’ll glance.

Numb3rs is about a crack FBI agent named Don Eppes and his young, math superstar/professor brother, Charlie. It’s a crime drama, but it’s not one of those blunt-hammer crime dramas where they rely on played-out police techniques like interrogation, blood samples, and wiretapping. No, these guys use math. Why math? Because math explains everything, even the allure of a show about math.

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