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You can try and change the world, but how about first starting with your own neighborhood?

Kristine Vejar says her revolution began in her own backyard with plants. The founder of Oakland, California based A Verb For Keeping Warm, says by being conscious of the materials used in her fiber shop, she leads a quiet, but no less active role in changing how she and others see place.

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How I Built a Brunch Around a Plant Foraged From the Banks of the East River

As I've done on so many other New York City Saturdays, this past weekend I had the pleasure of enjoying a late brunch with my good friend (and...

As I've done on so many other New York City Saturdays, this past weekend I had the pleasure of enjoying a late brunch with my good friend (and new neighbor), Bianca. Only this time, instead of hitting the latest neighborhood brunch spot or even just grabbing bagels and coffee at a nearby deli, I came over with a bag full of ingredients to cook my standard weekend breakfast. But in addition to the usual organic eggs, spinach, and mushrooms from the supermarket, and the giant croissant from corner market, I also had the field garlic I had uprooted that morning with my own two hands, and one large stick, just a few blocks away in the East River Park.

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Show Some Love for L.A.'s Lowly Loquat

L.A.'s most ubiquitous—and delicious—fruit is ready to be harvested. But most people don't even know it exists.

Come this time of year, it's as ubiquitous as a certain rabbit-shaped marshmallow candy. Yet the loquat—a pale orange, fuzzy fruit that grows rampant in Los Angeles—isn't showcased in pies, smothered in whipped cream, or featured in flax seed smoothies. It doesn't even show up in grocery stores, for the most part. No, the lowly loquat is largely ignored, ripening slowly to its tart-sweet finish alone on the streets of Los Angeles. Meaning that L.A.'s most plentiful produce is all yours for the taking.

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Why Rene Redzepi's Noma Cookbook is Worth Reading

Chef Rene Redzepi's latest cookbook is more than just local Nordic food. It's a wider reflection of the culture of place.

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