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Childbirth is the number one reason American women visit the hospital, and it ain't cheap. In fact, it's getting more and more expensive. A new study published in Health Affairs found that the cost of having a baby with employer-sponsored health insurance increased by almost 50% in the past seven years.

The study evaluated "trends in cost-sharing for maternity care for women with employer-based health insurance plans, before and after the Affordable Care Act," which was signed into law in 2010. The study looked at over 657,061 women enrolled in large employer-sponsored health insurance plans who delivered babies between 2008 and 2015, as these plans tend to cover more than plans purchased by small businesses or individuals.

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In Case You Can't See the Difference Between The Affordable Care Act and Rocket Science

An impenetrable bubble made from a volcanic diamond alloy may just be the innovative health care solution young invincibles have been waiting...

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1K6MglKzOg&feature=youtu.be

This post is brought to you by GOOD with support from The California Endowment, Health Happens Here with Prevention.

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Six Questions About Obamacare Answered

As a late 20-something, I could very possibly be a member of the "young invincibles," a label used to describe people between 18 and 34 who do not have health insurance because they think they're, well… invincible (not to mention broke).

As a late 20-something, I could very possibly be a member of the "young invincibles," a label used to describe people between 18 and 34 who do not have health insurance because they think they're, well… invincible (not to mention broke). 



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Obama Has Insured 2.5 Million 20-Somethings. Will That Make Us Vote For Him?

If Obama knows what's good for him, he'll use this health care coup to woo back his most ardent supporters. But will it be enough?


Thus far, the fight over "Obamacare" has been mostly over a hypothetical law—most provisions of the Affordable Health Care Act don't go into effect until 2014. But one major element took effect right away: the ability for parents to insure their kids under 26. The Obama administration and other private researchers estimated earlier this year that about 1 million previously uninsured Americans ages 19-25 had gained coverage under this part of the plan. They were wrong: It's 2.5 million.

I'm not surprised that 20-somethings have taken advantage of this policy. My friends and I have all gone through long stretches of being uninsured since college because of unemployment, low-wage jobs without benefits, or fleeting contract positions. Still, it's heartening news. It's also significant for President Obama's upcoming campaign. The Pew Research Center recently found that although millennials remain Obama's biggest supporters, they're less enthused about him than they were in 2008. And fewer young people care about politics than they did back then— the percentage of millennials who say they care a good deal about who wins the White House has dropped from 81 to 69 percent since October 2007.

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