GOOD

Your Favorite Public Education Reformer Probably Went to Private School

Many of today's prominent education reformers attended private school. Their policies for public schools are a far cry from that experience.

What do some of the nation's most prominent public education reform advocates—Michelle Rhee, Jeb Bush, Bill Gates, President Obama, and Davis Guggenheim—all have in common? They received their K-12 education at private schools. "In Public School Efforts, a Common Background: Private Education" from this Sunday's New York Times spotlights this phenomenon and raises important questions about the discrepancy between the well rounded education these reformers received at elite private schools like Exeter and Sidwell Friends, and what they recommend for other people's children.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Does New York City Give Preferential Treatment to White Schools Chancellor Candidates?

Since 2000, chancellors lacking the credentials to run New York City's schools have been granted waivers. Critics say that's because they're white.

Did former Hearst Magazines Chairman Cathie Black get a waiver to become chancellor of New York City’s public schools because she's white? According to Roger Wareham, a human rights attorney and member of the Brooklyn-based Freedom Party, the answer is, "Yes."

Wareham has filed a petition against a host of players-including Mayor Bloomberg and State Education Commissioner David Steiner, who was involved in both Black's appointment and the granting of the waiver. The waiver enables Black to become chancellor despite lacking a master's degree required by the state.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

The Money is in Manhattan, Kansas

Government data show incomes are up in America, but not everywhere. A tale of two Manhattans (Kansas and New York) explains the uneven rebound.


Incomes are up. According to the United States Bureau of Economic Analysis per capita income has risen 4.8 percent over 2009, but not evenly. What's interesting is where the jumps happened. In particular, a tale of two Manhattans emerges, according to Business Week.

Over the past year some smaller areas that rely on government and military for employment, such as Jacksonville, North Carolina and Manhattan, Kansas, have experienced per capita income increases, while more affluent regions, such as the area that covers Manhattan, New York, watched per capita income drop 4.6 percent, to $52,375, over the same period.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles