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High School Teens Vote for Prom-munism

Students at an Albuquerque united in favor of a communist prom.

Screencap from the KQRE news video.

When seniors at Cottonwood Classical Preparatory School in Albuquerque voted for a prom theme this year, the masses casted their ballots in favor of Prom-munism. The winning decision, however, appears to have incited a class war (ha ha, get it?), and the grumbly teenaged McCartheyite dissenters who voted instead for “A Night in the Reef,” say they don’t find communism to be very funny. If the pinkos have their way, it’s likely Cottonwood’s seniors will be swigging kvass instead of fruit punch, which as we all know is a petite bourgeois beverage.

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Starting a New Tradition: Georgia Students Hold School's First-Ever Integrated Prom

For the first time ever, black and white students at Wilcox County High School dressed up and danced the night away together.

A group of high school seniors at Wilcox County High School in rural south Georgia made history this past weekend by bucking their community's longstanding tradition of racially segregated proms—yes, one prom for white teens and one for black teens. Indeed, thanks to the inspiring students behind the Integrated Prom movement, for the first time ever, black and white students in the community dressed up and danced the night away together.

How does a community get around having a prom that's open to everyone without violating any civil rights laws? Easy. You just don't let the school sponsor it. After the courts integrated the schools in the area, proms became private, invite-only events. White parents began raising funds for an all-white senior prom, leaving black families with no choice but to follow suit and host proms for their children.

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Vintage Racism: The "We Don't Want Trouble" Defense Makes a Comeback

Want proof that "post-racial America" is a myth? Look no further than a timeworn racist excuse.

Back in the Jim Crow days, there were two basic approaches to racism in the segregated South. You were an aggressor—a lawmaker wedded to segregation, a member of a lynch mob, a scientist trying to prove non-white people were inferior, or your garden variety white person who might use a racial epithet. Or you were a bystander—someone who maintained the status quo by saying, "We don't want any trouble."

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