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Shoe Made From Recycled Ocean Trash Pops Up in Time for Summer

Adidas teams up with Parley for the Oceans to create a new line made from colorful sea garbage.

As a rule I’m skeptical of big brands “going green,” but it seems adidas might just be on to something. Recently the sporty retail giant teamed up with Parley for the Oceans—an idealistic group of “creators, thinkers and leaders” attempting to re-purpose the ocean’s overwhelming amount of trash into reusable material—for a mystery project. Monday at the United Nations the brand unveiled their collaboration: the world's first ever shoe upper made solely from harvested ocean plastic and illegal deep-sea gillnets. The nets were retrieved after a 110-day expedition by Parley partner organization Sea Shepherd, where they tracked an illegal poaching vessel off the coast of West Africa.

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New Upcycle Tech Gives Dead Phone Batteries a Second Lease on Life

The BETTER RE power pack taps old and discarded batteries for remaining charges.

BETTER RE is a power pack able to tap old and discarded batteries for remaining charges.

The sad thing about “smart” phones is that they very quickly lose their luster, usually just a few short years after purchase. Apps become incompatible, download times take longer and longer, and, the most popular complaint, batteries often don’t stay charged. But what if, instead of chucking your phone or its battery, you could use it down to very last drop? BETTER RE, a new kickstarter project, promises to extract the last amperes of energy as a “short term backup power pack solution.” At 67.65mm (2.66 inch) by 128.5mm (5.05 inch), this tiny device is slim, portable, and based on a simple, single platform—compatible with a variety of different smartphone batteries, both big (2,800 mAh) and small (1,810 mAh).

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Hong Kong Fights Litter Pandemic With Hi-Tech Public Shaming

Hong Kong’s new eco-ad campaign utilizes DNA analysis to create digital portraits of litterbugs.

Each city seems to tackle trash in its own, unique way. In New York City, that way seems to be almost non-existent, as this coffin left in the street and used-mattress mountain will attest. Hong Kong, however, has decided to go hi-tech in its approach to trash reduction. Recently, in honor of Earth Day, Hong Kong Cleanup, Ecozine, The Nature Conservancy, and Ogilvy teamed up to create a new eco-friendly campaign to fight the city’s ongoing litter issues with serious creativity. The Face of Litter utilizes DNA traces from street rubbish to construct life-like digital portraits of litterbugs. Scientists can determine a litterer's eye, hair, and skin color, even their ancestry, from DNA left on the smallest piece of trash. The technology is now so advanced it can even assess the shape of the trash person’s face, as well as a relatively accurate portrait.

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Recycled Amusement: A Ugandan Playground of Water Bottles

Eco-artist Ruganzu Bruno Tusingwire will use a prize from TED to create a water-bottle playground in Kampala, Uganda

Ugandan eco-artist Ruganzu Bruno Tusingwire doesn’t play around when it comes to play. The winner of TED’s first City 2.0 Award for 2012, a prize designed to encourage innovation in cities, is using part of his $10,000-prize to construct an amusement park for kids in Kampala’s slums built from thousands of reused plastic water bottles. The playground—which currently consists of a single airplane-shaped sculpture—will serve as a commentary on the trash problem afflicting the rapidly expanding cities of the developing world. But that’s tangential to the project’s central motivation: to create a safe space for Uganda’s poorest youth, many of whom are afflicted by the psychological burdens of war, poverty, and disease.

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How San Francisco is Working to Become a Zero Waste City

Brought to you by IBM. Join GOOD for a live tweet chat today about how trash collection can go from "waste management" to "resource recovery."


This message is brought to you by our partner, IBM

Join GOOD and IBM for a live tweet chat on Friday, June 1 at 1 p.m. ET (#zerowasteIBM) about the future of recycling and how trash collection can go from "waste management" to "resource recovery." Instead of taking all collected trash straight to landfills, companies like Recology are rethinking how to manage the waste stream. Teaming up with IBM, Reoclogy is working to make San Francisco a zero waste city by using data to tailor recycling management to specific neighborhoods, as well as composting and extracting reusable items before they reach landfills.

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Project: Inspire People to Recycle More

Tell us how you think we can encourage those around us to adopt better recycling habits!

Things are easier said than done, or so the old adage goes, and we couldn't agree more. That's why we do The GOOD 30-Day Challenge (#30DaysofGOOD), a monthly attempt to live better. Our challenge for July? Waste less.

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