GOOD

Uber lost a huge lawsuit that could change how it is forced to treat its drivers.

It’s time to start treating drivers with dignity and respect.

(Via Flickr)

Sexual harassment, shoddy background checks, price gouging, a verbally abusive CEO: Uber may be in the business of rideshares, but when it comes to legal troubles, you could say the company hoards them all to themselves.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

There’s No Place Like Home/Office

Are live/work spaces like PodShare the future of creative collaboration—or too close for comfort?

Elvina Beck, the 31-year-old co-founder of PodShare, has an entrepreneur’s knack for tech-savvy euphemisms—the kind of linguistic flourishes that can take something ordinary, even unappealing, and rebrand it into an emerging locus of disruption. For example, the shared live/work spaces that her company provides are not hostels or hotels, but a collection of “membership-based housing.” The loft-style quarters are furnished with what you and I might call bunk beds. To Beck, they’re “pods.” The people who cohabitate in these pods aren’t roommates—they’re “podestrians.” That $900 a month that podestrians pay isn’t rent—it’s a “membership fee.” (Pods also run $30 to $40 a day for shorter stays.) If you have membership to one PodShare, you have membership to all of them. “You don’t have an address,” Beck says. “You have an access pass to a bed, a desk, a shower, a kitchen. You live in the cloud with a backpack, the clothes on your back, and whatever’s in your head.” It seems Podshare’s aim is to get us to live less like our parents and more like our data.

One windy morning at the newest PodShare in downtown Los Angeles, Beck and her business partner, Kera Package, 27, are standing in a billow of sawdust, the room littered with wood beams and studs. The site is located at the edge of the booming Arts District and will soon be home to 24 pods. A few weeks before the PodShare opens for business, the raw skeletons of six pods stand erected against one wall. Structured like display cases for human bodies, the pods face outward to give residents a clear view into their fellow podestrians’ sleeping quarters. Each individual pod is part of a single that’s outfitted with a TV and electrical outlet, so that it may be used as a work space in the daytime. Members’ names will be written on chalkboard labels on each bed. There’s a small kitchen in one corner of the room; a staircase in the opposite corner leads up to a second-floor work space. This location is the third in LA, but Beck has visions for pods around the globe.

Keep Reading Show less
Money

Why Universal Income Caught One Facebook Cofounder’s Eye

What if everyone got a check from the government?

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Meet the German Couple Finding Roommates for Europe’s Refugees

So far, 122 Germans and Austrians have opened their homes through the Airbnb-like service.

Mareike Geiling and Jonas Kakoschke, founders of Refugees Welcome. Credit: Jean-Paul Pastor Guzmán / Flüchtlinge Willkommen

Roommates can be a pain: loud music deep into the night, dishes left in the sink for days. But Mareike Geiling and Jonas Kakoschke (they’re a couple) say their Berlin flat has never been cleaner since their new roommate from Mali moved in. Another unusual part of the arrangement: the 39-year-old, who won’t use his name for safety reasons, pays his $430 share of the rent through donations.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Research Suggests Uber Might Be Making Our Roads Safer

A new report points to some encouraging news when it comes to the popular car service’s effect on DUI-related deaths.

image via (cc) flickr user slemmon

There is a lot that can be said about Uber, the popular car service and mobile app. On one hand, the company has been hailed as the gold standard of sharing-economy startups, providing a much-needed service to cities with transportation systems strained by overuse. On the other, Uber has faced any number of criticisms regarding how it handles users’ private data, its liability policies for its drivers, and the company’s general “disruptive” business model, to name just a few. But now there is new research to indicate that Uber may not simply help travelers from point A to point B, but may, in fact, be helping make the roads safer for us all.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Why Businesses Are Turning to Car-Sharing for Company Cars

Instead of companies investing in their own vehicles, employees have access to WeGo cars at anytime. Employees can unlock the cars with the WeGo app and a manager's permission.

You know the collaborative consumption trend is taking off when it starts infiltrating business practices. The good news is, it is. Increasingly, forward-thinking companies are considering ways to share resources, such as turning to car-sharing services for company cars rather than owning their own fleet.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles