Rethinking technical parole violations and our focus on failure and recidivism.

Individuals, families, and communities are harmed when someone is returned to custody for making a U-turn.

SERGEI SUPINSKY/AFP/Getty Images

Just a few years ago, Nelson served 90-days at the notorious Rikers Island jail for making an illegal U-turn. If that seems unreasonable, it’s because it is. Under current law, individuals on parole can be re-incarcerated for weeks, months, or even years for violating the conditions of their parole, such as being late for curfew, fare evasion, changing one’s residence without permission, or making a U-turn. The circumstances are often inconsequential. When individuals are re-incarcerated for these non-criminal offenses, they are referred to as technical parole violations (TPVs). While the number of individuals entering our prisons for new crimes is on the decline in many states, those incarcerated for TPVs is increasing significantly, revealing a disturbing trend in our criminal justice system.

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Bill Gates Pens An Essay For the Class Of 2017

He wrote an essay with advice for the class of 2017.

Bill Gates via Twitter

As the richest individual on Earth, Microsoft founder, programmer, and philanthropist Bill Gates is hounded for advice on a daily basis. So, from time to time, he drops pearls of wisdom for those looking to follow in his footsteps. On Monday, Gates wrote an essay full of great advice for the graduating class of 2017. In the essay, Gates shares what he wish he knew in college and what he’d do if he was graduating today.

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A Change To The App Will Now Allow You To Clearly See Your Rider Rating On Uber

It's now very easy to see where you stand in the eyes of drivers

A recent update to the Uber app will let you easily learn where you stand in the eyes of every Uber driver you’ve ever had. Now, when you see your profile on the app, your rating (as determined by the drivers you’ve used) will be right under your name.

The move comes as part of an effort to make customers more aware of their behavior, so that they’ll ultimately be better behaved while riding.

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An Architect Is Taking On Homelessness By Creating Beautiful Cardboard Houses For The Needy

She's taking her innovative designs from her backyard to cities across the world.

Tina Hovsepian was born and raised in Los Angeles, and as a resident, she witnessed firsthand one of the worst homelessness epidemics plaguing the United States on the streets of downtown LA, in an area known, formally, as Skid Row.

Studying architecture in school, her path allowed her to work towards a solution to address and help the homeless she saw every day on her city’s streets. In one of her architecture school classes, she focused on creating a product that was inexpensive and durable enough to create temporary housing for the homeless. After experimenting with many different materials, she found that cardboard was the optimal material for her product, not only cheap, strong, and insulated, by recyclable as well.

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Kiva + PayPal: 10 Years of Small Loans and Big Impact

In our first issue, GOOD profiled an emerging nonprofit with a wild idea. A decade later, that little nonprofit has made nearly a billion dollar difference

“My jaw dropped—knowing it was utterly brilliant,” recalled Max Schorr, fellow co-founder of GOOD, of the first time he met with Jessica Jackley and her then-fledgling nonprofit Kiva. This was more than a decade ago, the fall of 2005. GOOD hadn’t technically launched yet, though we’d set our launch date in the months ahead. Kiva was in prototype stage as well. Both our organizations, along with a scattering of other aspiring and active social innovators, piled into a side room of the Net Impact conference held at Stanford to set up our tables and hawk our big ideas to whomever might pass by.

Microlending pioneer Kiva and it's founders profiled in the premier issue of GOOD in 2006.

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Bill Gates has a bit of egg on his face—after the Microsoft mogul pledged 100,000 chickens to a group of impoverished countries, one of the recipients cried foul. (fowl?)

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