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How Hate-Filled is Your Home State?

Southern Poverty Law Center’s interactive “hate map” shows you just how many active hate groups are located in your home town.

According to the Southern Poverty Law Center, there were 784 active hate groups operating in the US last year.

What if I told you that easy-going, liberal, blue state California had the most bigots, racists, and general haters of any state in the union? According to a map of active hate groups in each region, created by non-profit Alabama think tank the Southern Poverty Law Center, the gold coast state had the dubious honor of being the most hate-filled (organization-wise) state last year, followed in order by Florida, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. Surprisingly, it seems that the tri-state area, despite having one of the largest Jewish populations in the world, is a hotbed of neo-Nazi activity. The only states to be spared from such small minds were Alaska, and Obama’s birthplace, Hawaii. According to their site, the group compiled the list using “hate group publications and websites, citizen and law enforcement reports, field sources and news reports.” To weed out lone wolves, the group left out websites that seemed to be created or run by one individual, making sure to delineate between violent individuals and organized, well-administrated hate groups. As the site mentions, “Listing here does not imply a group advocates or engages in violence or other criminal activity.” It just implies that y’all really hate minorities.

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Watch This Y.A. Author Break Down Racism in America by the Numbers

The majority of white Americans don’t think that racism is a significant problem in America.

The Fault in Our Stars author John Green has a not-so-secret alter ego in YouTube-land. Along with younger brother Hank Green, the acclaimed writer runs the wildly successful channel vlogbrothers, where the two spout thoughts, opinions, and general correspondence about everything from the mating patterns of giraffes to explainer videos about the American health care system.

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L.A. Student Does Graduate-Level Research on His High School, Finds It Lacking

"The majority of our computers at Crenshaw are still running Windows XP." A Crenshaw High student compares his school to one in Beverly Hills.

Do students in low-income neighborhoods understand the ways in which their schools are failing them? A group of teen researchers from some of the toughest high schools in Los Angeles do. As part of the UCLA-based Council of Youth Research, local students do graduate-level studies on their own schools and share their findings with their teachers and principals. This year the teens studied the availability of resources like books, computers, and counselors at their schools, and they're not happy about what they discovered.

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Want to Major in German? Good Luck With That

The end of the Eurocentric world view? The number of four-year colleges offering French, German and Italian as majors is on the decline.



Bad news for fans of European languages. According to a new study by researchers at the University of California at Riverside: Since 1970, an increasing number of schools have dropped traditional Romance languages— like French and Italian—from the choices of possible majors. And if you want to major in German, good luck finding a school offering it.

In 1970, almost 44 percent of four-year colleges offered German as a major. By 2006, that number had dropped down to just under 27 percent. As for French and Italian, 76 percent of schools offered those majors in 1970. Now only 59 percent of campuses offer them. And, since the study ends in 2006, before recession-induced budget cuts became the new normal, the number of schools dropping majors in the three languages is probably much higher.

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Feast Your Eyes: Drinking Around the World

A new World Health Organization report shows who's drinking what, where—and how it's killing them.


The Economist has created this chart from the World Health Organization's newly published Global Status Report on Alcohol and Health 2011.

World consumption in 2005 averaged out at the equivalent of 12.95 pints of pure alcohol per person aged 15 years or older, according to the report, which also noted "marked increases" in consumption in Africa and South-East Asia between 2001-2005. Most astonishingly, nearly 30 percent of all alcohol consumed each year is moonshine or home-brewed liquor.

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Food for Thinkers: A Crusade Against Waste

When Jonathan Bloom writes about food, he writes about the 40 percent of it we grow and then throw away, uneaten.


When Jonathan Bloom writes about food, he writes about the 40 percent of it we grow and then throw away, uneaten. If, as he argues, the role of a food writers in general is to "celebrate the joy that food brings while raising the right food flags," then his own job within that larger landscape is to force us to think about the environmental damage we do when we each send something like 1,400 calories' worth of perfectly edible food to the landfill, uneaten, every single day:

As I see it, waste is one of the largest threats to our food supply. I’m not alone there, as the recent State of the World 2011 report warned about waste. As hunger persists, reducing waste and improving (re)distribution are vital. And as the global population inches toward 7 billion, we need to be more efficient with what we grow to ensure that all are fed.

Food waste also has a significant environmental impact. Agriculture is a real resource hog. A massive amount of oil goes into growing, harvesting, processing, shipping and cooling our food. At least 2 percent of all U.S. energy consumption goes to produce food that is thrown away. And agriculture represents about 80 percent of all water consumption.

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