GOOD
via Twitter / Bye,Bye Harley Davidson

The NRA likes to diminish the role that guns play in fatal shootings by saying, "Guns don't kill people, people kill people."

Which is the same logic as, "Hammers don't build roofs, people build roofs." No duh. But it'd be nearly impossible to build a roof without a hammer.

So, shouldn't the people who manufacture guns share some responsibility when they are used for the purpose they're made: killing people? Especially when the manufacturers market the weapon for that exact purpose?

Keep Reading Show less
Business

Hear What This 97-Year-Old Lesbian Has To Say About Gay Marriage

“I had to struggle to make it. This is mind-boggling. This is wonderful.”

Image via the author

Jerre Kalbas is one of the oldest living lesbians in New York. While so many young gay people consider women like Ellen and Wanda Sykes as household names, Jerre grew up in a time when being gay wasn’t something you ever celebrated with a parade—it was something you hid inside the confines of an underground bar. So when I called Jerre shortly after the Supreme Court made its historic decision, and asked if she ever thought gay marriage would pass in the United States, she had exactly this to tell me:

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Get Excited: America is the Gayest It’s Ever Been

It’s not just gay marriage we’re celebrating today. It’s 8.8 million gay people.

Image via Wikimedia

A couple of days ago, conservative Texas pastor Rick Scarborough made an earnest pledge to all Americans: if the Supreme Court passed gay marriage, he would stand up for all that’s good in this world, and set himself on fire. As an alternative, Scarborough also generously offered to be shot (aw, whatta guy!). 100, 30, or even ten years ago his answer might have been met with applause. But 2015 is a different year and a different era, and Scarborough was greeted with beautiful heaps of Internet derision. Today, the pastor’s Twitter account is thankfully silent, as gay people and their allies come to celebrate not a man in flames, but a movement on fire. It’s not just gay marriage we’re celebrating—it’s 8.8 million gay people.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

U.S. Supreme Court Bans Mandatory Life Sentences for Juveniles

The court decides such treatment is "cruel and unusual."

Two Alabama men convicted of murder when they were boys have had their life sentences thrown out today, setting precedent in a ruling closely watched by juvenile justice activists.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

How Much Do Colleges Care About Diversity? We're About to Find Out

If the Supreme Court bans affirmative action, we may discover how much colleges care about genuine diversity. We may not like the answer.


During a heated election year, the Supreme Court has decided to take on another hot-button issue: affirmative action. Abigail Fisher challenged the 2003 case Gratz v. Bollinger, claiming that she was unconstitutionally denied admission to the University of Texas because she is white. Because there are a higher proportion of conservative justices than in 2003, and liberal Elena Kagan is recusing herself, it's likely the court will rule against the use of race-based affirmative action. What hangs in the balance? Both the amount and type of diversity at our colleges and universities.

Here's the background: Barred from using race in admissions by the Hopwood v. Texas ruling in 1996, the University of Texas responded by creating two paths to entrance: one that used class-based affirmative action for all races, and one that automatically admitted Texas graduates who were in the top 10 percent of their high school classes. When the 2003 case was decided, the university added race to the considerations. The "top 10 percent" program accounts for 81 percent of those admitted; Abigail Fisher is suing because the university used race as a criteria for the remaining 19 percent of admission seats. So even if the court overturned that part of the admissions system, it would still leave the “top 10” program in place, which may become a model for the rest of the country. Depending on the scope of the Supreme Court decision, it could transform the terms of the discussion over affirmative action from race to class.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Reminder: The Supreme Court Agrees With Mitt Romney About Corporations

Mitt Romney's assertion that "corporations are people" may be infuriating, but according to the Supreme Court, it's not wrong.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E2h8ujX6T0A

Yesterday, a video of Mitt Romney declaring that "corporations are people, my friend" circulated around the Internet. He didn't literally mean that. This is more how it went down:

Keep Reading Show less
Articles