GOOD

World Teachers' Day Pushes For Gender Equality on Campus

The organizers want you to thank a teacher and push for gender equality in the teaching profession.

Today is World Teachers' Day, a chance for students and former students to acknowledge the hard work teachers do every day. Founded in 1994 and observed annually on October 5 in more than 100 nations, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization and Education International promote the day as an opportunity to celebrate educators and advocate for international standards for the teaching profession. Sure, you can send a teacher a thank-you note through the site, but UNESCO and Education International want the public to think about the big-picture issues affecting the world's educators. This year's theme for the day is "teachers for gender equality".

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

College Students Create Device that Helps Legally Blind Students Take Notes

Assistive technology brings classroom notes back to low-vision and legally blind students.

Remember the days of sitting in class, copying down what your teacher scribbled on the board? Now imagine the frustration you'd feel if you couldn't see that board. That's the situation San Diego State University student Jeremy Poincenot found himself in almost three years ago after contracting an extremely rare disorder called Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy. As Poincenot shares in the above video, he'd lost his love for the college experience due to his inability to fully follow what was going on in class. That is, until he connected with Note-Taker, an assistive technology that helps "low-vision and legally blind students take notes in class as quickly and effectively as their fully-sighted peers."

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

How Blogging Helps Students Crush the Digital Divide

Forget pen and paper: This is a fresh way to get students from low income backgrounds excited about writing.


While teachers are certainly finding success engaging students through Twitter, in the real world those kids have to know how to write more than 140 characters. We've written before about how blogging is a fun and fresh way to encourage reluctant students to write. And, as Oceanside, California, teacher John Schwartz discovered, it even works with students from low-income backgrounds with varying degrees of English proficiency.

This past school year Schwartz taught a 36-student, fourth/fifth-grade combination class at Garrison Elementary School. Over 60 percent of his students "came from households where English was the second language, or wasn’t spoken at all," and most of their working parents "were able to provide limited academic support."

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Enterprising Teacher Is Crowdsourcing the Cost of Harvard Grad School

Donors who chip in to send Philadelphia English teacher Zac Chase to Harvard will get access to his educational experience.


After the thrill of college acceptance letters comes the reality of figuring out how to pay the cost to actually attend the school of your choice. One Philadelphia English teacher, 30-year-old Zac Chase, has a creative solution to funding his master's in education policy and management program at Harvard: He's crowdsourcing the cost.

Chase told the Philadelphia Inquirer that the idea came to him because the school he's taught at for the past four years, Science Leadership Academy, has such a strong entrepreneurship and social media focus. He estimates the cost of tuition, room and board at $60,000, so when a merit scholarship fell through and he found that he could only afford to borrow $20,000, the lessons he'd been teaching students inspired his plan to come up with the other $40,000. Chase doesn't want a handout. Instead, he wants funders to consider their donation an investment that they'll get something out of—access to his educational experience. On his "Chasing Harvard" project site, he writes

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Sex Ed: One Teacher Dares to Talk Honestly with His Students

Why one teacher asks his students to respect and love each other enough to wait to have sex until they're ready.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Meet Danny, the Jungle Man

A teacher is reminded that the lessons that really stick are rarely a part of the official course material.

A teacher is reminded that the lessons that really stick are rarely a part of the official course material.

The best part about growing up in the Amazon was the people, and when I was a kid, one of my absolute favorite people was Jungle Man Danny Fast. Like me, Danny was raised by missionaries. But unlike me, he had spent a lot of his childhood in the deep jungle of Peru with an indigenous people called the Achuar.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles