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The Waterless City

Marveling at our massive systems of aqueducts—can L.A. ever get water from local sources?

Every three months, GOOD releases our quarterly magazine, which examines a given theme through our unique lens. Recent editions have covered topics like the impending global water crisis, the future of transportation, and the amazing rebuilding of New Orleans. This quarter's issue is about cities, spotlighting Los Angeles, and we'll be rolling out a variety of stories all month. You can subscribe to GOOD here.

Los Angeles has no business being a major city. That is to say, through the plain, unforgiving lens of physical geography, there simply isn’t enough water to quench the collective thirst of the roughly 10 million residents of Los Angeles County. If it weren’t for a handful of visionaries who imagined, planned, and built the L.A. Aqueduct—one of mankind’s most incredible civic work projects to date when it was built back in 1913—the Los Angeles we know and love today would never have been.

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The L.A. Times is Dead. Long Live the L.A. Times

David A. Greene examines the life, near-death, and uncertain future of America’s greatest daily newspaper west of the Mississippi.

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Bricks and Mortar in the City of Angels

The structures of Angeleno faith appear in stunning photographs.

Shelter, in its most basic form, is about physical protection from nature and the elements. Yet throughout history, man has built structures that offer solace for the spirit as well. Within the built environment of the modern city, the various architectures of churches and temples tell different stories: Some point upward to the sky, while some direct all traffic in through the front door. Some attract second looks with their ornamentation, while some warn the uninitiated to walk on by. And some, quite frankly, tell us that this was the most affordable space available.

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The Future Is Bright in Los Angeles

The poster child for transportation trouble has changed course, turning visions of a Blade Runner-esque dystopia into a thing of the past.

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