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Experience Five Hundred (Virtual) Years Of New York City History In A Single Elevator Ride

Elevator rides to the observation deck at 1 World Trade Center will offer passengers an astonishing view historical

image via NYTimes.com screen capture

In just 47 seconds, riders of 1 World Trade Center’s ultra-high-tech elevator system will be able to experience over five hundred years of New York City’s shifting landscape and skyline.

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Image of the Day: Mapping Racial and Financial Identity in America

Mapping America: Every City, Every Block is an interactive feature by The New York Times that allows you to explore the financial, racial, and educational make-ups of every city in America.

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Obama Health Care Bill Ruled Unconstitutional: What Does It Mean?

A central provision of the Obama Administration's overhaul of health care has been ruled unconstitutional by a federal judge in Virginia.


A central provision of the Obama Administration's overhaul of health care has been ruled unconstitutional by a federal district judge in Virginia, reports The New York Times. It's the first court in the nation to rule against the bill—two previous decisions in suits against the bill upheld it—but it probably won't be the last. From The Times:

In a 42-page opinion issued in Richmond, Va., Judge [Henry E.] Hudson wrote that the law’s central requirement that most Americans obtain health insurance exceeds the regulatory authority granted to Congress under the Commerce Clause of the Constitution. The insurance mandate is central to the law’s mission of covering more than 30 million uninsured because insurers argue that only by requiring healthy people to have policies can they afford to treat those with expensive chronic conditions. ... A major question, therefore, has been whether the income tax penalties levied against those who do not obtain health insurance are designed to regulate “activity” or, as Virginia’s solicitor general, E. Duncan Getchell Jr., has argued, “inactivity” that is beyond Congress’ reach.

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Can You Fix the U.S. Budget? Test Yourself

If you haven't tried The New York Times's Budget Puzzle yet, give it a shot. Balancing the budget is easy when you don't have to deal with Congress.

If you haven't tried The New York Times's Budget Puzzle yet, give it a shot. It's a quick interactive exercise that lets you make all the hard decisions (or easy, politically unpopular decisions, as the case may be) to see if you can come up with a combination of cuts and taxes that balance the books.

Here's my solution. Fifty-seven percent of my savings came from tax increases (I returned the estate tax to Clinton-era levels and instituted a carbon tax, among other things) and 43 percent came from spending cuts (I cut military spending everywhere I could).

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