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Experience Five Hundred (Virtual) Years Of New York City History In A Single Elevator Ride

Elevator rides to the observation deck at 1 World Trade Center will offer passengers an astonishing view historical

image via NYTimes.com screen capture

In just 47 seconds, riders of 1 World Trade Center’s ultra-high-tech elevator system will be able to experience over five hundred years of New York City’s shifting landscape and skyline.

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How Nonemployed Americans Really Spend Their Weekdays

This jokey flowchart reveals more about the jobless lifestyle than the New York Times’ recent data-driven analysis.

Unemployment—the monkey’s-paw, be-careful-what-you-wish-for punishment for all those long days at work you spent yearning for freedom. Now here you are, filling your afternoons with this and that, applying to jobs you know you’ll never hear back from, eating cereal and milk out of an old tin can, and having tea parties with the cat. Vacillating between leisure, guilt, and bursts of inspired action, your future is uncertain; your time is dangerously unregimented, and your shirt is on inside out. Sound familiar?

Not everyone’s unemployment experience is of the tragi-comic variety, but almost 30 million Americans between the ages of 25 and 54 don’t have regular jobs and still somehow fill up their waking weekday hours. Every year, the American Time Use Survey polls thousands of people on the minutiae of their daily routines, and yesterday, the New York Times sorted through the responses of out-of-work individuals, graphing out a day in the life of America’s jobless. What do these people do all day? Men are more likely to watch TV and socialize, while women are more apt to spend their time taking care of others. Some, expectedly, look for new jobs, take classes, and otherwise better themselves. The unemployed also tend to sleep more and do more housework than most employed individuals. The Times visualizes the data a number of interesting ways, most notably drawing the distinctions between the behaviors of men and women—check out the piece for the full breakdown.

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The New York Times' White People Problem

America's paper of record continues to overlook people of color on its "Room for Debate" page: Should we care? (Yes.)

The Grey Lady is at it again. Last month, under the title "Rising Wealth Inequality: Should We Care?" the New York Times published an op-ed debate between nine financial experts, not a single one of whom was a person of color. Black Americans have barely one-tenth the wealth of white Americans, so one would think it might be important to get at least one African-American voice into the mix, and yet, nothing.

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TSA: Body Scans, Pat-Downs, and Junk-Inspired Acronyms

An enhanced look at TSA terminology—from enhanced pat-downs to porno-scanners to "don't touch my junk"—that are touching sensitive areas.

An enhanced look at TSA terminology—from pat-downs to porno-scanners to "don't touch my junk"—that are touching sensitive areas. \n

The airport has long been a source of frustration and humor, as you well know if you’ve ever missed a flight, endured a screaming baby, or watched Airplane (RIP, Leslie Nielsen). The annoyance and comedy rose to new levels in the past month, as the Transportation Security Administration unveiled the new “whole-body imagers,” along with the enhanced pat-downs that you’ve either experienced or (more likely) heard about by now. These aggressive gropings caused a national outcry that could be summarized by the words of Alias’s Sydney Bristow, who once responded to a full-scale frisk by pointing out, “It’s not a date!”

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