GOOD

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qy_t6Jh_XCc

I've been obsessed with the concept of radical transparency lately, especially as it relates to global health and development work. This is perhaps an extension of the push for strong monitoring and evaluation in the field to ensure that development projects are actually accomplishing good in the world.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Put Down the Post-Its: We Need to Define What 'Innovation' Really Means

This post is part of a series from students in the Master of Arts in Social Design program at Maryland Institute College of Art, which focuses...


This post is part of a series from students in the Master of Arts in Social Design program at Maryland Institute College of Art, which focuses on how design can reimagine solutions to world challenges. For the next eight weeks, MASD students will each share their personal thesis journey. Follow the series at good.is/MASD.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Coming Clean: Cycling's Watershed Moment

Lance Armstrong's admission last week that he cheated during his career is a watershed moment for cycling and creates an opportunity for real reform.


Lance Armstrong's admission last week that he cheated during his cycling career will have profound repercussions through the sport that goes far beyond doping. Armstrong painted a picture of a sporting hierarchy that supported a culture of doping, a clear indication of a lack of good governance.

This is a watershed moment for cycling and creates an opportunity for real reform. Although the Armstrong confession does not answer many of the key questions about how cycling is run, it shows the need for a transparent and inclusive reform process to help world cycling build a reputation for honesty and accountability.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Don't Wait to Find Out How Green Your Smartphone Is

AT&T's new rating system will help consumers find more sustainable phones, but smartphone builders need to play along.

Smartphones are becoming ubiquitous in our progressively wired world—roughly one-third of American adults own them, according to the Pew Research Center—but there’s no way for consumers to judge the environmental impact of their phones, an especially large concern given how often people upgrade and turn millions of “returned phones” into trash.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Can Transparency Solve the Boba Guys' Profit Problem?

Can the market reward businesses who emphasize transparency?

Keep Reading Show less
Articles