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Stanford Has a Class on Eating Like an Adult

“It doesn’t matter if they’re rocket scientists. Doing the perfect poached egg is still kind of important.”

Stanford University is trying to “demystify the kitchen.” A new program launched with the of help of health food celebrity chef Jamie Oliver, the Teaching Kitchen, is teaching students how to grocery shop, cook and eat healthily.

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The University of Vermont Officially Recognizes ‘Neutral’ as a Gender

Wish schools would ditch the tired gender binary already? It’s happening.

Wish schools would ditch the tired gender binary already? Fret not, trans and genderqueer rights crusaders. The University of Vermont is leading the way.

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Why Universities Are Building Superefficient Power Plants

The Department of Energy has called cogeneration plants “one of the most promising options in the US energy efficiency portfolio."


James Merrihue takes me through a pair of gray double doors from the sleek halls of New York University’s Stern School of Business, and immediately it’s warmer. Most students probably walk by these doors every day without considering what’s behind them. But when I follow Merrihue through a series of doors and hallways and down a flight of stairs, we reach a cavernous, steaming hot room, the length of a city block, where a system of turbines, generators, heat exchangers, and chillers provides electricity, heat, and hot and cold water for dozens of campus buildings.

This system lives just below ground, a block off Washington Square Park, underneath a pleasant walkway spotted with local grasses and benches. If you sit and listen quietly, you can hear the noise of the turbines spinning at 13,000 revolutions per minute below. Once, the university created energy in this spot by burning oil. In that plant, you could smell the diesel exhaust fumes, Merrihue, the plant manager, tells me. But this new plant, which opened in 2011, starts by burning natural gas, which produces less air pollution and fewer greenhouse gas emissions. After that fuel produces electricity, the plant takes the leftover energy and uses it over and over again. "That's what gets us the efficiency”—almost 90 percent, says Merrihue. The hot exhaust from two gas-fired turbines fuels a steam turbine, which produces additional electricity. The leftover steam travels to a hot water heat exchanger and then to a chiller, where the last bit of energy is used to cool a 2400-gallon tank of water down to 45 degrees.

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Is the White House Committed to Addressing the Role Poverty Plays in the Achievement Gap?

The Department of Education is allocating more money to the Promise Neighborhoods program. Is it enough to make a real difference?


More money is coming to the U.S. Department of Education's year-old Promise Neighborhoods program. Modeled after Geoffrey Canada's successful Harlem Children's Zone (HCZ) initiative, the Promise Neighborhoods program awarded $10 million in 2010 to 21 mostly nonprofit and higher education-based applicants. That money funded the planning stage of comprehensive, cradle-through-college-to-career wraparound services with great schools at the center. Now, starting today, the USDOE is launching a second phase of the program and will provide $30 million to a new round of grant applicants and fund the implementation of 4-6 existing projects.

But given that 20 percent of American students live in poverty, will this limited amount of money scale up the interventions fast enough to make a difference for kids?

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Now There's a WikiLeaks for Colleges

UniLeaks wants to expose shady dealings at the world's universities. Get ready to submit those secret emails, memos and contracts.


Can a WikiLeaks-style site keep colleges and universities transparent and honest in their dealings? That's the hope of a brand new Australia-based website, UniLeaks, which hopes to create a safe space for people around the world to leak information about back-door shenanigans going on at their schools. The anonymous founders state that they were inspired to create the site after witnessing the "creative forms of resistance" young people in the United Kingdom took in response to government austerity measures.

According to the site's "Who We Are" section, they'll accept anonymously submitted "restricted or censored material of political, ethical, diplomatic or historical significance which is in some way connected to higher education, an agency or government body working in partnership with an institution, e.g., a university." That means they want those private emails between professors, copies of shady contracts, secret research, and internal memos. Whistle-blowers can upload their documents through an encryption-free electronic drop box. The site's journalists then turn them into news stories.

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