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GOOD Ideas for Cities: Enticing Tourists into City Centers

A plan from Richmond, Virginia uses supergraphics and green space to encourage freeway travelers to make a stop in their city.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WUDYSBsXaI

Richmond, Virginia has a beautiful downtown and vibrant arts community, but its freeway exits are less than enticing. Unfortunately, these are all that many tourists see of Richmond as they travel to other locations. How can the city use these gateways to give travelers a taste of the city's history and culture? At GOOD Ideas for Cities RVA, the whyRVA team tackled the challenge of bringing these tourists into Richmond who might otherwise not make the stop.

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Do State Legislators Need a College Degree?

Almost 25 percent of state legislators don't have a bachelor's degree. Does America need lawmakers with more schooling?

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The Most Literate American Cities Are College Towns

Amazon's ranked its top 20 most well-read cities according to book sales, and college towns are winning.

Do you live in a college town? If so, chances are you're a big reader. Retail giant Amazon has announced its list of the "Top 20 Most Well-Read Cities in America." They tracked purchases of magazines, newspapers, books, and e-books since January 1 for cities with more than 100,000 residents. While Cambridge, Massachusetts, home of Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is number one, the rest of the list is dominated by big college towns.

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An English Teacher is First Known American Casualty in Japan

A 24-year-old English teacher is the first known American casualty of the tsunami.


A 24-year-old English teacher, Virginia native Taylor Anderson, is the first known American casualty from the Japan's earthquake and tsunami disaster. Anderson spent the last three years teaching at an elementary school in Ishinomaki, Japan. In the aftermath of the quake, the dedicated teacher helped reunite students with their parents. She was last seen riding her bicycle away from the school. Her school was left unscathed by the tsunami, but sadly, Anderson's home neighborhood was not so lucky.

Anderson had studied the Japanese language since middle school and, after graduating from Randolph Macon College, she moved to Japan, the country she loved. Her parents, Andy and Jean Anderson, released a statement saying "We would like to thank all those whose prayers and support have carried us through this crisis. Please continue to pray for all who remain missing and for the people of Japan."

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