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Offering parental leave for new fathers could help close the gender gap, removing the unfair "motherhood penalty" women receive for taking time off after giving birth. However, a new study finds that parental leave also has a pay gap. Men are less likely to take time off, however, when they do, they're more likely to get paid for it.

A survey of 2,966 men and women conducted by New America found that men are more likely to receive paid parental leave. Over half (52%) of fathers had fully paid parental leave, and 14% of fathers had partially paid parental leave. In comparison, 33% of mothers had fully paid parental leave and 19% had partially paid parental leave.

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Anti-vaxxers are literally a plague upon society.

Thanks to them, highly contagious diseases such as measles, tuberculosis, and mumps are making a big comeback.

In fact, measles was thought to be eradicated in the US back in 2000 but there has been over 1200 cases in the U.S. this year.

via Centers for Disease Control

"The reason measles is coming back is that a critical number of parents have chosen not to vaccinate their children,'' said Paul Offit, director of the Vaccine Education Center at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, told USA Today.

"If you get to a few thousand cases, you'll start to see children die of measles again," Offit continued.

Ninety-two percent of U.S. children have received the MMR vaccine, while that number seems high, the number of children under two who haven't received any vaccinations has quadrupled in the last 17 years.

RELATED: A new study of over 650,000 children finds — once again — that vaccines don't cause autism

"More and more we're seeing people opting out of vaccinations out of a feeling they're in some way dangerous, which is absolutely and completely untrue,'' Judd Hultquist, assistant professor of infectious diseases at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine, told USA Today.

Anti-vaxxers' biggest fear is that vaccinations cause autism.

However, over 140 peer-reviewed articles published in specialized journals that document the lack of a correlation between autism and vaccines. Earlier this year, a study of over 650,000 children in Denmark found that the MMR vaccine didn't increase the risk of autism in children.

Even though anti-vaxxers spread contagious diseases because of their deeply-held, but incorrect, beliefs they want to be taken seriously.

RELATED: Anti-vaxxers cursed at ER staff who helped their son because he was 'isolated' to protect others

The aptly-named anti-vaxxer group Crazymothers made an appeal to the media on Twitter asking to start referring to them as "Vaccine Risk Aware."

"Dear Media," the open letter read. "Please retire the use of the term 'Anti-vaxxer.' It is derogatory, inflammatory, and marginalizes both women and their experiences. It is dismissively simplistic, highly offensive and largely false. We politely request that you refer to us as the Vaccine Risk Aware."

This inspired a flood of people to respond with their own hilarious and sometimes morbid new names for anti-vaxxers.

The tweet also inspired others to tee off on the Crazymothers for hurting children.


Health
Photo by Li-An Lim on Unsplash

The future generations will have to live on this Earth for years to come, and, not surprisingly, they're very concerned about the fate of our planet. We've seen a rise in youth activists, such as Greta Thunberg, who are raising awareness for climate change. A recent survey indicates that those efforts are working, as more and more Americans (especially young Americans) feel concerned about climate change.

A new CBS News poll found that 70% of Americans between 18 and 29 feel climate change is a crisis or a serious problem, while 58% of Americans over the age of 65 share those beliefs. Additionally, younger generations are more likely to feel like it's their personal responsibility to address climate change, as well as think that transitioning to 100% renewable energy is viable. Overall, 25% of Americans feel that climate change is a "crisis," and 35% feel it is a "serious problem." 10% of Americans said they think climate change is a minor problem, and 16% of Americans feel it is not a problem that worries them.

The poll found that concern for the environment isn't a partisan issue – or at least when it comes to younger generations. Two-thirds of Republicans under the age of 45 feel that addressing climate change is their duty, sentiments shared by only 38% of Republicans over the age of 45.

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The Planet
Photo by William Bossen on Unsplash

Large climate events, like Europe's crazy heatwave this summer, draw a lot of attention, but the U.N. is warning it's the smaller, unnoticed climate change events that should be getting our attention. Not only that, but they're more common than we think. In fact, we've been experiencing one a week.

According to Mami Mizutori, the U.N. secretary-general's special representative on disaster risk reduction, climate change isn't a long-term issue. "This is not about the future, this is about today," Mizutori told The Guardian. "Lower impact events," such as heatwaves and flooding, can wreak havoc just as much as the bigger storms, leaving death and destruction in their wake.

The point isn't to sit around and think about how we're all doomed; the point is to do something about it so that we're not doomed. Mizutori says we need to invest in solving the problem now. "People need to talk more about adaptation and resilience," she said. "We talk about a climate emergency and a climate crisis, but if we cannot confront this [issue of adapting to the effects] we will not survive," she told the Guardian. "We need to look at the risks of not investing in resilience." In other words, it's not just about stopping greenhouse emissions, it's about adapting to their effects.

RELATED: Climate change is unearthing artifacts from melting glaciers

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The Planet
via Found Animals Foundation / Flickr

Service dogs are true blessings that provide a wide array of services for their owners based on their disability.

They can provide preventative alerts for people with epilepsy and dysautonomia. They can do small household tasks like turning lights on and off or providing stability for their owners while standing or walking.

For those with PTSD they can provide emotional support to help them in triggering situations.

However, there are many people out there who fraudulently claim their pets are service or emotional support animals. These trained animals can cause disturbances in businesses or on public transportation.

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Communities
Olympic Games / Du Baihua

Every four years, the world comes together for the Olympics. We set aside our differences of race, religion, and nationality and are, for a brief moment, just citizens of the world. The event itself says it promotes "peace, friendship and understanding in the world." Now, top Muslim group, Emgage, is saying the location of the 2022 Winter Olympics, Beijing, China, violates the ideals of the Olympics.

Emgage works to increase Muslim American involvement in politics. They held the first Muslim-American presidential forum, and released a report showing a 25% increase in Muslim voters in swing states from 2014 to 2015. Now, they want the U.S. Olympic National Committee to boycott the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing, saying that the Chinese government has been persecuting Uighur Muslims (ethnically Turkic Muslims).

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Culture