GOOD

Join Us for GOOD Ideas for New Orleans on July 12

Our final 2012 GOOD Ideas for Cities event asks four teams of New Orleans creatives to address local challenges facing the city.

GOOD Ideas for Cities taps creative problem solvers to tackle real urban challenges and present their solutions at live events across the country. Thanks to a partnership between GOOD and CEOs for Cities and a generous grant from ArtPlace we've brought the program to six cities in 2012, and New Orleans is the final city in our series.


Three months ago we issued a call for New Orleans creatives, who we organized into four teams. Each team has been issued a challenge proposed by the Neighborland community and paired with an urban leader working in the challenge space. At the event, they'll present their ideas for a solution—and some real-life interventions already in action—to that challenge. The urban leaders will then join them onstage for a brief Q&A moderated by GOOD Ideas for Cities editor Alissa Walker. Afterwards, a reception will provide a perfect time for everyone to talk about how to move these ideas for New Orleans forward.

Thursday, July 12
Doors at 6:00pm
Program begins at 7:00pm

New Orleans Museum of Art
One Collins Diboll Circle, City Park
New Orleans, LA 70124

RSVP here

Hosted by Neighborland and AIGA New Orleans

The Challenges

1. Getting around New Orleans without an automobile is often difficult. Limited infrastructure for bicyclists, poor quality sidewalks, and infrequent transit service all contribute to this situation. Driving less is a public priority that contributes to improved health outcomes, a better environment, and even a more prosperous city. Bike Easy and Transport for NOLA both work to make biking in New Orleans easy, safe and fun. How can we help make biking in New Orleans a better option for trips around town?

Urban Leaders: Jamie Wine, Bike Easy and Rachel Heiligman, Transport for NOLA

Creative Team: Jay Casteel, Jo Barrios, Joel Carranza, Rosalie Cohn, Tippy Tippens, Brittany DesRocher, Julia McNabb, Kathleen Onufer, Mary Carlton, Ross Peizer, Serena Wales, Brooke Larsen, Chad Cramer, Ness Higson

2. There is lack of affordable, accessible, and sustainable healthy food in New Orleans. Katrina decreased access to healthy food by more than 50%, and racial disparities in access have worsened. To address this problem, Grow Dat Youth Farm invests in the local network of growers, distributors, and professionals through an innovative method: developing the skills, leadership potential, and employment opportunities of New Orleans youth. How can we empower New Orleans youth to educate New Orleanians about healthy food, and help them get healthy food into the hands of those that need it most?

Urban Leaders: Jeanne Firthe, Grow Dat Youth Farm and Jeff Schwartz, Broad Community Connections

Creative Team: Ashley Braquet, Carey Clouse, David Burley, Harry Graham, Jakob Rosenzweig, Sarah Calandro, Susannah Burley, Zach Lamb, Aron Chang, Daniela Marx, Liz Beeson, Paul Richard, Amber Dawn, Brooke Butler, Jeff Gonzales, Kat Arnold, Will Miller

3. Neighborhood street corners across New Orleans are often in disrepair. This neglect can make our blocks feel unwelcoming and unsafe. Constrained by expense and other concerns, beautification of our intersections is seldom a priority. The Creative Alliance of New Orleans works to provide training, education and information to the New Orleans community to protect our cultural legacy and promote revitalization. How can we help empower artists, cultural producers, and neighborhoods to take beautification into their own hands?

Urban Leader: Tori Bush, Creative Alliance of New Orleans

Creative Team: Alyson Kilday, Austin Lukes, Christina Coble, Ella Camburnbeck, Patrick Kelly, Ryan J. Bordenave, Sergio H. Padilla, Jack Milazzo, Juliet Meeks, Zachary Gong, Ze daLuz, Jeffrey Scanlan

4. Food trucks are an important source of economic opportunity for entrepreneurs of all types. They can also enhance the culinary culture of our city, enliven streets, and provide food options in underserved areas. However, the codes governing mobile vendors are out-dated and overly restrictive, resulting in fewer jobs, less food service, and less tax revenue. The New Orleans Food Truck Coalition is working to educate leaders and stakeholders about food trucks and leading efforts to reform municipal ordinances. How can we help educate people about food trucks or otherwise advance reform?

Urban Leader: Rachel Billow, New Orleans Food Truck Coalition

Creative Team: Jennifer Nathan, Kelley Troia, Maggie Tishman, Mary Louise Killen, Sarah Azpeitia, Barrie Schwartz, Cambria Martinelli, Sarah Baird, Jake Minton, Jules R Goins, Justin Shiels, PJ Rosenberg, Skye Truax

Check out the videos from our other events and stay tuned for details about future GOOD Ideas for Cities announcements. If you'd like to talk about bringing the program to your city or school, email alissa[at]goodinc[dot]com or follow us at @IdeasforCities

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