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Tango Electric Car Goes from 0 to 60 in Four Seconds, Fits in Your Handbag

We asked the inventor-illustrator Steven M. Johnson to find examples of products and ideas that move the world forward in creative ways.



We asked the inventor-illustrator Steven M. Johnson to find examples of products and ideas that move the world forward in creative ways. This week, he reports on the Tango, a narrow, tall electric vehicle with tandem seating. Johnson believes that for the Tango to be successful it needs to be affordably priced—which could be as low as $10,000 if mass-produced, according to its inventor, Rick Woodbury. For that to happen it would need to capture the imagination of plenty of “early adopters” who understand the car’s unique and futuristic features. It is fast, economical to operate, and yet much safer than it looks. With a low-slung battery pack weighing 2,000 lbs., and an overall weight of over 3,000 lbs., as well as racing seats, a roll bar, and heavy, steel-reinforced doors, the car is claimed to be safer to drive than most cars. The vehicle may give a taste of the look of future small commuter vehicles.
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Conservative radio host Dennis Prager defended his use of the word "ki*e," on his show Thursday by insisting that people should be able to use the word ni**er as well.

It all started when a caller asked why he felt comfortable using the term "ki*e" while discussing bigotry while using the term "N-word" when referring to a slur against African-Americans.

Prager used the discussion to make the point that people are allowed to use anti-Jewish slurs but cannot use the N-word because "the Left" controls American culture.

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According to the FBI, the number of sexual assaults reported during commercial flights have increased "at an alarming rate." There was a 66% increase in sexual assault on airplanes between 2014 and 2017. During that period, the number of opened FBI investigations into sexual assault on airplanes jumped from 38 to 63. And flight attendants have it worse. A survey conducted by the Association of Flight Attendants-CWA found that 70% of flight attendants had been sexually harassed while on the job, while only 7% reported it.

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