Mobile Dental Clinic Brings Care to Poor Children

After the preventable death of a 12-year-old boy, a new mobile clinic in Maryland hopes to provide the kind of basic dental care that can save lives.

The price of dental care is exorbitant and, for many, simply more than they can afford. The Washington Post reported on a new dental clinic attempting to bring care to poor children in Prince George's County, Maryland.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles


Springwise reports today on a Seattle-based medical services provider that provides 24/7 house calls via webcam, Skype, or phone.

Carena is an alternative to emergency room services. An analysis of more than 35,000 house calls delivered that way, however, inspired the creation of a system that supports virtual house calls as well. Carena, meanwhile, can extend the geographic reach of its services while reducing costs for clients and patients.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Look to the Future for Health-Care Solutions

A new report on the future of health focuses on high tech solutions.


The Institute for the Future released a new report today focusing on the possible changes for the future of the health care industry instead of the mostly dire and grim realities today. The HC2020 Perspectives forecasts the key areas that are going to shape the future of health care in the next 10 years.

The most fascinating potential identified in the report was about neurointerventions:

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Exercise More, Remember More: Exercise Improves Memory

Just another part of your body that exercise makes better.



According to a new study, exercise can slow down neurocognitive decay in adults as they age. The Wall Street Journal reports on the study showing that exercise can boost memory and the ability for the elderly to reverse normal brain shrinkage:

As people age, the hippocampus, the brain's memory center, loses 1% to 2% of its volume annually, affecting memory and possibly increasing the risk for dementia. A growing body of evidence has pointed to aerobic exercise as a low-cost hedge against neurocognitive decline.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

A Methadone Clinic Opens in Tanzania

The clinic is part of the legacy of President Bush's anti-AIDS campaign in Africa.



The first of its kind in Sub-Saharan Africa, Tanzania's new methadone clinics are attempting to deal with problems new to the African Nation--Heroin. According to The New York Times, the clinics were established by the United States under George W. Bush and his anti-AIDS campaign:

Tanzania now has an estimated 25,000 drug injectors, 40 percent of them infected with H.I.V., according to the Pangaea Global AIDS Foundation, a San Francisco-based group that is advising the Tanzanian government on the program. The United States President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, created by President George W. Bush, is paying for it.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

The Placebo Effect Is Really a Great Thing

A new study finds that pessimists might feel more pain.



A new study out in Science Translational Medicine shows that the benefits of painkillers can be boosted or wiped out simply by manipulating some very simple factors. The BBC reported on how a patient's attitude can affects on the results of studies and in the use of new drugs.

Heat was applied to the legs of 22 patients, who were asked to report the level of pain on a scale of one to 100. They were also attached to an intravenous drip so drugs could be administered secretly. The initial average pain rating was 66. Patients were then given a potent painkiller, remifentanil, without their knowledge and the pain score went down to 55. They were then told they were being given a painkiller and the score went down to 39. Then, without changing the dose, the patients were then told the painkiller had been withdrawn and to expect pain, and the score went up to 64.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles