GOOD

For more than 20 years. Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME) has served the citizens of Maine in the U.S. Senate. For most of that time, she has enjoyed a hard-fought reputation as a moderate Republican who methodically builds bridges and consensus in an era of political polarization. To millions of political observers, she exemplified the best of post-partisan leadership, finding a "third way" through the static of ideological tribalism.

However, all of that has changed since the election of Donald Trump in 2016. Voters in Maine, particularly those who lean left, have run out of patience with Collins and her seeming refusal to stand up to Trump. That frustration peaked with the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court.

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Politics

Last week, GOOD reported on an Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) morning briefing sent to Department of Justice employees which contained a link to a white nationalist blog post.

The link was to a story attacking immigration judges published on VDare, a site that the Southern Poverty Law Center calls an "anti-immigration hate website" that "regularly publishes articles by prominent white nationalists, race scientists and anti-Semites."

A spokesperson for the EOIR responded to the incident by saying "The Department of Justice condemns anti-Semitism in the strongest terms."

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Politics

If you haven't heard of Rep. Will Hurd (R-TX), he's a fascinating study in American democracy. Hurd is the only black Republican serving in Congress. He represents a district that covers the longest stretch of land covering the U.S./Mexico border and his district is 71 percent Latino. Needless to say, he has some complicated feelings about building a wall with our southern neighbors and says President Trump has never reached out to him to discuss border policy.

And now, he's also decided he's decided to get out of Congress.

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Politics