GOOD

Everything You Need to Know About Cooking with Blood

The Nordic Food Lab's innovative approaches to a culinarily neglected ingredient

Back in 2008, renowned Danish chef René Redzepi and restaurateur Claus Meyer, now known to foodies as the masterminds behind the four-time world’s best restaurant Noma, opened a peculiar test kitchen in Copenhagen. The Nordic Food Lab, as they called it, was a space for chefs to experiment with the weird, new, and taboo in a way they never could in a working kitchen. Ever since, they’ve scored headlines with reports on cooking with fermented grasshoppers, pheasant essence, and even beaver anal glands. But perhaps no report they’ve issued has garnered as much attention and consternation as the one released this January by then-Food Lab intern Elisabeth Paul on how to substitute blood for eggs.

Blood-based cooking has certainly been a part of Western cuisine since the time of ancient Greece, when blood sausages were mentioned in Homer’s Odyssey. And in all likelihood, people have used animal blood for sausages, soups, pastes, or drinks since the first animal slaughter. But sometime in recent history, we forgot how to use blood. The ingredient grew so taboo that even Scottish chef Nick Nairn vomited on television at the site of a bowl of cooking blood.

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Food

Recycled Seashells Transform Beach Into a Dazzling Art Installation

Artist Subodh Kerkar uses thousands of repurposed mussel shells to create a stunning, undulating “ode to the ocean.”

To celebrate the ‘Sculpture by the Sea’ festival in Aarhus, Denmark, artist Subodh Kerkar repurposed thousands of mussle shells into mesmerizing designs. Photo by Subodh Kerkar.

Each year for the last four years, the coastal city of Aarhus, Denmark, has turned their pristine coastline into a temporary outdoor art gallery. Sculpture by the Sea Aarhus, open from June 5th to July 5th along the coast of Tangkrogen to Ballehage, is Denmark’s largest art event and features an international roster of creatives. Now on view, the exhibition contains 60 sculptures and offers audiences “a unique opportunity to combine social and recreational activities, exercise, art, nature and common experiences.”

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Articles

Denmark’s New Eco-Friendly School is a Marvel of Solar Science

At 25,000-square-meters, the Copenhagen International School will draw huge amounts of solar power from 12,000 panels.

Is there anything Scandinavians can’t do? Whether it’s creating a waterfall in one of the world’s greatest cities, or producing practical everyday furniture, they seem to have this design thing down to a science. Now, in addition, they are also kicking the world’s butts at eco-friendly architecture. Recently Denmark-based C.F. Møller Architects unveiled ambitious plans for an epic, solar-powered building in Nordhavn, Copenhagen, to be completed in 2017. It will be called the Copenhagen International School (CIS) and at 25,000-square-meters it shall stand as the city’s largest school. CIS’s roof will be outfitted with 12,000 solar panels, intended to supply over half of the annual electricity needs for the school’s projected 1,200 students and 280 employees.

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Pedal Pushers: Denmark Unveils a Bike Commuter's Dreamland

The Danish capitol will be served by 26 solar-lit commuter cycle superhighways, completely free of traffic.

Imagine a city fed by dozens of miles-long bike super highways, separate from roads, streetlights, and harried drivers. Imagine living 10 miles outside a metropolis and zipping home from work—faster than you would in a car—on a solar-lit, asphalt ribbon, eliminating one ton of your personal carbon load annually. Witness the latest reason that Copenhagen is officially a bike commuters' Shangri-La: a bike super highway connecting the city to the suburb of Albertslund.

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In Copenhagen, Gas Stations Morph Into Bike Repair Shops

Norwegian energy company Satoil has installed bike care stations in Copenhagen.

It's a rocky road out there for bicyclists riding car-dominated streets and freeways. With potholes, angry drivers, and the constant threat of a swift pancaking all posing hurdles, biking means always moving against the flow of traffic. But in Copenhagen, one of the most bike-friendly cities in the world, an oil company is making things just a bit easier for the two-wheeled commuters.

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Electric Car Charging Stations Get Funded in Denmark

Better Place, the alternative transportation startup run by entrepreneur Shai Agassi, has rounded up $135 million to build charging stations for electric cars in Denmark. The oddly-named Danish utilty company Dong Energy has partnered with Better Place to supply the power. Better Place has a sort of..

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