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This is What Ten Years of Oklahoma Earthquakes Sounds Like

Years worth of data transformed into a unique soundtrack of increasingly frequent seismic activity affecting the Sooner State.

image via (cc) flickr user rockbandit

Over the last several years, Oklahoma has seen a dramatic increase in the number of earthquakes rocking the Sooner State. According to one study, Oklahoma’s seismic activity leaped an astonishing four thousand percent between 2008 and 2013, due, the study concludes, to hydraulic fracturing for the purpose of ground oil collection, or as it’s more commonly known: “Fracking.” While the exact nature of the relationship between fracking and earthquakes is one which science is still struggling to define (questions of proportionality, predictability, and perhaps most importantly, prevention, still linger), there is no doubt that something serious is happening underneath Oklahoma.

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How You Can Lend Your Support to Nepal

You don’t need money to help out.

A devestating earthquake rocked Nepal over the weekend. Photo via Flickr user Domenico.

Organizations That Don’t Require Your Money

Image via Micromappers

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Rethinking Humanitarian Relief: Sourcing Locally Before Disaster Strikes

Rather than a cash flood in the wake of disaster, Advance Aid advocates for "disaster security"—connecting relief with longterm development goals.

When disaster strikes a place like Haiti, Somalia, or Indonesia, the response in the developed world usually follows a similar trajectory: massive aid appeal from local NGOs supported by celebrity faces, a large influx of funds from reliably generous Americans, and an eventual petering out of urgent media coverage in the ensuing weeks.

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Reconstruction Zone: Chronicling Haiti's Post-Quake Struggles

“Nobody faced what we have faced here in Haiti.”



See more photos from Haiti, and what you can do to help.

“There was just a 7.0 quake right outside of Port-au-Prince. This will be a big deal.”

Two years ago today, I was the night editor for a national radio show. Around 5:20 p.m. Eastern time, the AP newswire flashed this sparse dispatch from a videographer working in Haiti, who had seen a collapsed hospital in a town up the hill from Port-au-Prince. "People are screaming for help,” the message added. Within seconds, we were calling everyone we knew with a Haitian phone number.

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One Month After the Earthquake, Japan Hustles to Keep Students on Track

Two-thirds of schools in the ravaged northeastern coastal region are destroyed or damaged, but students will be heading back to class next week.

A little over a month after the March 11 earthquake and tsunami disaster, it's back to school time in Japan. The island nation's school year began in the first week of April, and officials plan to have students living in some of the most affected coastal areas hitting the books as early as April 20. If it sounds like too much too soon for surviving students who are surely suffering from post-traumatic stress and living in shelters, officials say getting back into a routine will help children regain a sense of normalcy.

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