Renters Are Fighting Back Against Their Landlords Through #VentYourRent

They’re fighting against high rents and poor living conditions.

New York City politician Jimmy McMillan gained nationwide fame and praise when he started the Rent Is Too Damn High Party in 2005 to support his unsuccessful gubernatorial run. McMillian’s message would go over well in London these days where the average price of an apartment is £1,500 a month ($2200 U.S.) and rents have risen 10.7 percent in 2015 alone. On top of the astronomical prices, many renters feel they’re getting screwed by poor housing conditions as well.

That’s why Londoners are fighting back against their landlords on social media through #VentYourRent, a campaign created by Generation Rent. “The hashtag #ventyourrent is unearthing the scale of common problems like damp and mice, all the way up to the most shocking experiences like poisoning, ceilings falling in and bullying landlords and letting agents,” Generation Rent’s Dan Wilson Craw told Dazed.

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Here’s How Millennials Can Fix Their (Scrambled) Nest Eggs

This is how you get millennials to care about fiscal responsibility

At this point in my life, I am nearly $50,000 in debt. So I went out and spent $100 on brunch last weekend. Weirdly, it helped.

Any sane person would interpret the above combination as someone making extremely bad life choices, but the coexistence of brunch and debt are hallmarks of the millennial generation. Though, to be fair, millennials aren’t the most debt-strapped demographic (largely due to our lack of mortgages).

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Trump Incorrectly Scolds General Motors On Twitter

GM quickly put out a statement to correct him.

via Twitter

Tuesday morning, president-elect Donald Trump struck out at another major American company from his favorite bully pulpit, Twitter. Trump scolded General Motors, threatening to tax them for manufacturing its Chevy Cruze abroad.

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Bill Gates has a bit of egg on his face—after the Microsoft mogul pledged 100,000 chickens to a group of impoverished countries, one of the recipients cried foul. (fowl?)

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How To End Worldwide Poverty By 2030

It’s a bold idea—and it’s actually happening

A bold experiment announced by the nonprofit GiveDirectly builds on growing evidence that simply giving people money can play a major role in mitigating the worst pains of extreme poverty, particularly among those living on $1 a day or less. Conventional wisdom says it’s too impractical, too costly, and unlikely to forge real change. But independent studies, including randomized control trials, indicate that one-off cash transfers can boost food consumption, improve the health of children, and help people and their small businesses establish long-term incomes. Despite concerns from skeptics, recipients don’t appear to buy unhealthy or frivolous items.

Of course, a basic income doesn’t solve all the big problems linked to extreme poverty. They don’t pay for public goods—things like roads, health clinics, or electricity grids—which are essential ingredients for successful market economies, but they do seem to expand people’s options in making their own life choices. GiveDirectly recently promised to go “next level” later this year, targeting more than 6,000 people in dozens of villages around Kenya, where poverty levels remain at over 40 percent. The program will provide participants with a basic income of around $0.75 to $1.10 per person per day for 10 years, and will partner with prominent independent researchers to assess the long-term effects through various metrics.

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These 8 Photos Will Transport You to the Golden Age of Electric Car Advertising

The electric car craze started almost a century ago, and here are the photos to prove it.

Visit any Whole Foods Market and chances are you’ll run into (or find yourself waiting behind) some variation of a pastel-colored electric car. While it may appear that electric cars have sprouted up in the past two decades, their history can be traced way back to the early 1900s.

The first decade of the 20th century was considered a “golden age” for electric vehicles. According to the IEEE, nearly 28 percent of the 4,192 cars produced in the United States in 1900 were electric. In 1910, Thomas Edison even declared that “in 15 years, more electricity will be sold for electric vehicles than for light.” While he may have been off by just little, his prediction is understandable given the obsession with electric cars during the early 1900s.

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