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Embrace Your Inner Couch Baa’tato With a Televised Lamb-athon

Iceland TV hopes to promote their country’s “traditional farming life” by airing 24 hours of lambs.

Image via the Sjónvarpið (@sjonvarpid) Twitter feed.

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Iceland Creates Human Search Engine Guðmundur To Answer All Your Nordic Questions

“How cold is it in Iceland? Are there trees? Are elves real?” Guðmundur answers all.

Guðmundur is now taking calls.

Why ask Google, when you could ask Guðmundur? The newest social media campaign to come out of tech-savvy Iceland, Ask Guðmundur, features representatives from across the country offering their local nordic knowledge, and acting as the world’s first IRL “human search engine," or more accurately, your own, personal, internet-based Iceland guides. The platform, presented by Inspired by Iceland, is aimed at helping tourists discover Iceland’s less traveled paths, and features seven Icelanders, from different regions, named Guðmundur (male) or Guðmunda (female) who will proudly offer up their insider knowledge, tips, and mystical treasures.

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Scientists Map Out Entire Genetic Code of Iceland

In the uniquely homogenous nation, some see great promise for disease prevention, others worry about privacy.

Norsemen landing in Iceland, by Oscar Wergeland. Most of Iceland's population descends from a relatively small group of settlers, making this kind of genetic testing uniquely feasible.

Late last month, researchers out of Iceland announced that they’d made a major leap in the field of genetics: They’d mapped the entire genetic code of their nation, the largest genomic study ever. This project, detailed in four interconnected papers in the current issue of the scientific journal Nature Genetics, was the culmination of 18 years of work by deCode, a local private research company (purchased by California’s Amgen after declaring bankruptcy in 2009). And according to these papers, the firm’s research isn’t just cool in abstract. As a roadmap for further studies, it has the potential to revolutionize the way we develop and target medical treatments, from drugs to surgical interventions.

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How Elves and Serpents are Saving Iceland for Future Generations

Most Iceland residents believe in magic to some degree, and it’s helping to preserve the environment, foster community … and rake in tourism dollars

Illustration by Tyler Hoehne

Last month, the mayor of the 2,200-person town of Egilsstaðir in eastern Iceland matter-of-factly announced that his government had verified video proving the existence of the Lagarfljótsormur, the Iceland Worm Monster. A fixture of Icelandic myth since 1345, the Worm is supposedly a 300-foot sea serpent, which thrashes about and slithers up onto the surface from within the glacier-fed Lagarfljót Lake. Some say the Lagarfljótsormur was put there by men, some say it was tied to the bottom by Finns to keep its bloody appetites in check, and some say its lashing and churning portends disaster. But rather than go the way of most wyrms—into myth, history, and crackpot theories—a casual, possibly coy half-belief in the Lagarfljótsormur and many more magical creatures still persists in Iceland, with modern-day sightings by government officials, entire classrooms of children, and as in the case of the 2012 film that supposedly confirmed the serpent’s existence, men casually observing a roiling river demon over a cup of coffee. Many suspect these “beliefs” are just opportunistic bids for attention or tourism dollars. But no matter the motive, the Lagarfljótsormur and its mythic kin now play a significant role in shaping Iceland’s relationship with and preservation of its own culture and the natural world it’s tied to.

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Why Your American Wiener is Unimpressive

We should all be envious of Iceland’s tasty, high-quality hot dogs

Illustration by Tyler Hoehne

Hot dogs have a pretty bad reputation in America. At best they’re mystery meat, at worst sodium nitrate- and MSG-laden symbols of all that’s cheap and gross in our culture. As the World Series kicks off Tuesday, and peak wiener season gets into full swing, this is as good a time as any for Americans to examine their sausage culture, from the dirty water dogs of New York City to the Dodger Dogs of Los Angeles. Though there are thousands of types of sausages from around the world, maybe the best tube-steak tutorial can be gleaned, surprisingly, from Iceland, where the hot dog is a widely celebrated, unironic national treat.

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Why Iceland Evaluates Its Students' Self-esteem

What American schools might learn from researchers in Iceland about how testing not only literacy and math, but the emotional lives of children.

What American schools might learn from researchers in Iceland about how to test not only literacy and math skills, but the emotional lives of children.

Over the last few years, Iceland has gone from economic boom to bust and is back on the upswing. All of these rapid changes have had drastic effects on lifestyle, which everyone assumed would trickle down to the well-being of the nation's children. Sadly, it's historically been difficult to track.

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