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This article originally appeared on Global Citizen. You can read the original version here.

Addy Tritt just showed how donating to a good cause doesn’t have to cost a fortune.

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Michael Moore

Michael Moore seemed to be one of the few people able to see how Donald Trump would swing key Democratic territories in the Rust Belt, propelling him to win the 2016 presidential election. But now he’s making another bold prediction: Trump’s ascension will be derailed by the Electoral College.

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With A Republican Texas Elector Defecting From Trump, The ‘Hamilton Plan’ Gains Momentum

“I swore an oath to defend my country and Constitution against all enemies, foreign and domestic”

No Trump Sign

A group known as the Hamilton Electors—Electoral College members who will cast their electoral votes to help officially decide the president of the United States—has determined the president-elect to be unqualified, adding yet another wrinkle to this historic election. Now, The group has gained a new ally in Republican Texas elector Christopher Suprun, who, in The New York Times, skewered Donald Trump for eschewing leadership and responsibility in the run up to the electoral vote on December 19.

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UNICEF Creates a Virtual Girl To Bring Attention To Children Living In Conflict

She was created using the faces of 500 children around the world

According to UNICEF, there are 250 million children currently living in countries affected by conflict around the world. More than 19 million of them are refugees, while others struggle in countries plagued by war, man-made disasters and climate-change events. To bring attention to their struggles, UNICEF has given these children a voice by creating a 3-D animated seven-year-old girl named “Sofia.”

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Felons, Flames, and the New Debate Over Prison Labor

California's worrisome dependence on inmate firefighters needed a good challenge—and accidentally got one.

Image by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Southeast Region via Wikimedia Commons

On Monday the AP released a report revealing that California’s Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation was considering a plan to allow violent offenders incarcerated in state prisons to fight the state’s rampant wildfires. The proposal merely sought to expand an existing (and largely accepted) inmate firefighter program, and it was far from a done deal—if the DCR signed off on it, the plan would have still required approval from the state’s Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. Yet the mere notion of violent offenders walking around outside prisons, maybe in small communities, freaked citizens right out of their skins. After just one day of mass outrage, the plan died; state officials won’t confirm that this sudden failure of the long-debated program resulted from the backdraft from the AP’s report. But considering the level of outrage, it’s hard to imagine the proposed program’s swift subsequent demise is unrelated.

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