GOOD

This summer I embarked on a cycling journey across America, pedaling 4,700 miles on a bamboo bicycle handmade in Ghana. My aim was to inspire Americans to start living a happier healthier lifestyle—and each and every day I spread environmental awareness. In an extreme attempt to lead by example, I followed a set of rigorous ground rules:

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And The Most Walkable City In San Diego County Is...

WalkSanDiego achieved a major milestone last fall with the release of the Regional Walk Scorecard

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WalkSanDiego achieved a major milestone last fall with the release of the Regional Walk Scorecard. Cities throughout San Diego County were rated based on three factors: 1) policies and infrastructure that support walking; 2) the number of collisions involving pedestrians; and 3) data from more than 1,500 walk audits conducted by volunteers armed with WalkSanDiego’s new “BestWALK” phone app. The Scorecard is sponsored by Sharp Health Plan.
The Results\n
National City edged out La Mesa and Solana Beach for the highest score—for several reasons. First, National City's recently updated General Plan includes strong policies and plans favoring walking, biking, and transit use. In addition, the city is laid out in a typical pre-war grid pattern—a dense network of lower volume streets and a mix of destinations and transit stops within walking distance of most residences. A high number of residents who walk or use transit to get to work also helped boost their score.
La Mesa also has a walkable street pattern and detailed policies that will increase walkability in the coming years. In addition, La Mesa has aggressively implemented pedestrian improvements in key areas. Solana Beach, the third-ranked city, scored in the middle of the pack on policies and implementation and had the lowest percentage of walk/transit commuters. However, Solana Beach streets received high marks by BestWALK volunteers and the low number of pedestrian collisions in the region has raised its overall score.

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Round Em Up: Bike Corrals Moving Into Streets Nationwide

A dozen vehicles where only one fit before? Sounds like an idea worth stealing.

How often to do you find yourself foraging desperately for bike parking? You've pedaled to your local cafe or to the hardware store or to the bar and you have to scrounge around for some viable place to lock up your wheels. A parking meter perhaps? Maybe there's a free street sign? Or a tree? Figuring out what to wrap one's U-lock around is part of the urban cyclist's conundrum.

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San Diego Is Bridging the Digital Divide with Refurbished Computers for Low-Income Families

Trying to do research for an assignment or type a paper without your own computer is really hard.

Can you imagine trying to do research for an assignment or type a paper without your own computer? For low-income students, this is often the reality. Sure, they can sometimes trek to public libraries to use computers there, but with long waits, time-use limits, and libraries cutting back their hours, more kids are left without a way to complete critical schoolwork. The San Diego County Office of Education's "Unlimited Access" program, a collaborative effort with businesses and nonprofits, may have a solution.

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Rejected From College: If You're a Woman, A Less-Qualified Man Probably Took Your Spot

Men are getting a leg up in the admissions game, all in favor of "gender balance."


With college acceptance letters hitting mailboxes in full force this month, high school seniors are either celebrating being accepted to their dream school, or learning to love the idea of attending a safety school. But, for female students rejected from private liberal arts institutions, that rejection might have happened precisely because they're female. Yes, so-called male affirmative action continues to roll on in private college admissions, and it's all, supposedly, in pursuit of gender balance.

The issue first came to the forefront back in 2006 in "To All the Girls I've Rejected" a New York Times op-ed by Kenyon College dean of admissions and financial aid Jennifer Britz. Britz described the real angst of sitting in a room of admissions officers rejecting women in favor of sometimes less-stellar male applicants all because of school's desire for gender balance. Women earn 57 percent of bachelor's degrees and, if admitted according to merit, they'd easily be two-thirds (or more) of the students on a given campus. Apparently, in pursuit of diversity, campuses don't want the student body to be more than 60 percent women.

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Map: Where Will High-Speed Rail Be Most Effective

A new report has ranked the cities that would benefit the most from high-speed rail. See if yours made the list.


A new report by America 2050 has looked at the places in the country where high-speed rail could attract the most riders and, therefore, be the most effective. Download the full PDF here. The map above ranks them. The darker routes are better. As you can see, the Northeast corridor, California, and an area radiating out of Chicago are the most promising. The report is more specific about what is required to support high speed rail:

1: Major employment centers surrounded by medium-sized employment centers and population hubs all within 600 miles.

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