GOOD

You've Probably Seen An Emergency Alert On Your Phone. But Did You Notice How It Was Worded?

Here’s what happens when alerts like Hawaii's false alarm reach communities already in crisis.

[new_image position="standard large" id="null"]Warnings about Joaquin were not written in the plainest language. Image via Lisa Eastcoast/Twitter.[/new_image]

Back in October 2015, New Yorkers with smartphones were jolted by a collective ping, accompanied by a text message from the National Weather Service warning that the high winds of Hurricane Joaquin were imminent. Though Joaquin eventually veered off to Bermuda as a tropical storm, high surf and historic levels of tidal flooding devastated the Carolinas. And many of the alerts were written in complicated sentences using advanced vocabulary.

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Our Prescription Labels Aren’t Just Confusing. They’re Dangerous.

These researchers are on a mission to save us from bad pill-bottle designs.

Target’s clearly legible prescription labels were designed by a School of Visual Arts graduate — and they’re the exception in the United States. Image via Bart/Flickr.

Think about your most recent prescription medication bottle. The colors, symbols, fonts, and information there each serve a specific purpose. But was that information understandable?

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Image via Wikipedia

It might seem like an afterthought today, but plumbing problems have shaped many of civilization’s major developments—and setbacks. The Romans were on to something with their underground sewers, while less satisfactory sewage systems wreaked havoc during the Middle Ages. Now, as we set our sights on faraway galaxies, the age-old question remains: Where will we put our poop?

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The Cult Of The Wood-Burning Car

Giving the term “smoke trees” a whole new meaning

With the price of gasoline ebbing and flowing based on supply, demand and the ever-shifting winds of global politics, a favorite guessing game among transportation wonks and scientists has been the next vehicle power source to go mainstream.

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What Navigating Disney World Can Teach Us About Our Cities

Why must the “frictionless” ease of the Magic Kingdom remain a fantasy?

This spring, we’re celebrating innovators who are tackling pressing global issues. We call them the GOOD 100. In the spirit of solidarity, we’re also rolling out insights and personal stories from a select list of influential global citizens working in alliance with the world at large. We’ll be highlighting GOOD Citizens once a week.

"It's on America's tortured brow that Mickey Mouse has grown up a cow." That line from David Bowie's "Life on Mars" kept banging around in my head while I traipsed through the Magic Kingdom with my kids last week. Bowie probably meant something about sacred cows, but I won't profess to know. For me, something about cattle and Disney World made sense as I strolled around in what felt like a Temple Grandin masterpiece. The park had managed to combine crowded bovine passivity with ease of movement, evocative of animal scientist Grandin’s work to design corrals that reduced stress and panic in animals on their way to slaughter.

Okay, so that’s a little bit of a dark take on what I see as a caricature of good urban design. But truly, it’s something to behold. The Kingdom’s park design positions Cinderella’s castle as the center, or hub, with paths/spokes radiating in all directions to Tomorrowland, Fantasyland, and other worlds. That geographic array is matched with line-skipping consumption technology called the “Magic Band” (read: credit card bracelet) and combines to make distances feel short, navigation instinctive, and transactions seamless. Frictionless.

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This Brilliant German Housing Model Is the Sharing Economy at Its Best

Baugruppen—or “building groups”—are German co-housing projects entirely owned and designed by their residents.

Here at GOOD, we believe that design can be used to create positive social, environmental, and economic change. So we're joining forces with our friends at Impact Design Hub to share compelling stories about design that's moving the world forward. Below is an excerpt of a story developed in collaboration with Impact Design Hub: “Build Your Own Baugruppe – A Home For The Rest Of Us.”

Image courtesy of Noshe

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