GOOD

These Disappearing Packages Are Just Freakin’ Cool

Every company should try to trash their existing packaging for something like this.

For his master’s thesis project at the Pratt Institute, designer Aaron Mickelson decided to see if he could come up with solutions to the problem of all the waste produced by overly packaged commercial products. The results are super clever conceptual designs that prevent would-be trash from ever ending up in a landfill. Here's his idea applied to the Tide brand. To see more examples from this project, visit the website The Disappearing Package.

Reimagining Tide PODs

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Photo by Timothy Krause/Flickr

When it’s garbage day in Taipei, the capital of Taiwan, you won’t see abandoned trash bags on the streets waiting for pickup, as you might in Manhattan. Instead, you’ll find Taiwanese citizens lining up to heave their own bags into the garbage truck each and every night. By turning rubbish collection into a daily civic duty, this island of 23.5 million has been remarkably successful at achieving something that eludes most developing nations: The richer Taiwan gets, the less trash it produces.

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Curbside Shake-Up

A bold attempt to change the way 8 million New Yorkers take out the trash

Kathryn Garcia works in a 79-year-old granite Art Deco building overlooking Foley Square in Lower Manhattan. Its façade carries the names of great scientists and physicians: Hippocrates, Pasteur, Nightingale. Custom bronze medallions—Adonises in allegorical poses, farming, fishing, and harvesting—lining the wall above the side and rear entrances further hint at the building’s purpose. Known by New Yorkers as the “Health Building,” this is the home of New York City’s Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, the Health and Hospitals Corporation, and the Department of Sanitation.

On the 11th floor, colorful stickers of flowers and butterflies adorn the door marked “Commissioner of Sanitation.” New York has had 43 sanitation commissioners since the department was founded in 1881. The role was initially created to oversee the city’s street cleaners, and it was popularized in the late 19th century by Col. George Waring, a sanitary engineer who designed the drainage system in Central Park. As sanitation commissioner, Waring reformed the entire department, introducing new trash collection and street cleaning programs to deal with New York’s infamous “shin-deep” filth. A year after Waring became commissioner, the city threw him a parade to say thank you and later named an avenue in the North Bronx after him.

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Dumpster Pinhole Cameras Capture a City's Hidden Side

Sanitation workers who are also amateur photographers are documenting the city they keep clean.


You might only notice your local sanitation workers if your trash doesn't get hauled away on time. But a photography project by garbage collectors in Hamburg, Germany will have you seeing the people who empty your dumpster every week in a different light.

The aptly named Trashcam Project started in March after a group of workers-cum-amateur photographers teamed up with a local creative agency and got some pointers from a professional. Now they're documenting the city they help keep clean by turning dumpsters into gigantic pinhole cameras.

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GOOD Challenge Update: We're So Trashy

Halfway through our challenge to waste less, we're still pretty gross.

Things are easier said than done, or so the old adage goes, and we couldn't agree more. That's why we do The GOOD 30-Day Challenge (#30DaysofGOOD), a monthly attempt to live better. Our challenge for July? Waste less.

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My Weird Relationship With Waste

I’m no hoarder—look, no dead cats!—but I do have a messed up relationship with waste management.

Things are easier said than done, or so the old adage goes, and we couldn't agree more. That's why we do The GOOD 30-Day Challenge (#30DaysofGOOD), a monthly attempt to live better. Our challenge for July? Waste less.

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