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Students from Middle-Class Families May Qualify for Free Tuition from Stanford

The 5 percent admission rate is another discussion.

Photo via flickr user HarshLight

If you’ve got a quarter of a million dollars laying around, congratulations, you can probably afford to attend or send your kid on an all-expenses-paid four-year college education at Stanford—and a nice new car, to boot. But for those who can’t afford the estimated $230,000-plus in tuition, fees, room and board, books, and other supplies, the university may have just made getting that top-notch degree much more feasible for middle-class families.

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Obama Wants to Give You Two Years of Community College On the House

The President annnounced his new proposal to help students pay for college.

The tab on our national student loan debt runs at $1.2 trillion. It’s hard to even conceptualize how much money that is. But if anything symbolizes how irreparably broken our educational system is, it’s that amount: $1.2 trillion. U.S. leaders will be dealing with this problem for at least a couple generations but President Obama has just announced a proposal that might be the first step towards a solution: making the first two years of community college free. President Obama made the announcement via a video posted to his Facebook page on Thursday.

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Reaffirming 'Free Education for All': Cooper Union Students Take Stand on Tuition Debt

A group of students has come together as Free Cooper Union to keep their school tuition-free.

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A College Degree in Three Years? Why America Needs to Get on Board

Three-year degree programs save money and help students get on with their lives, but American students aren't signing up. They should be.

You'd think that given the spiraling cost of college, American students would jump at the chance to finish up school in three years instead of the typical four. With a three-year accelerated degree, parents have to fork over less cash for tuition and room and board, the family's loan burden is lighter, and students can get on with their career plans earlier. How does this not make sense? But despite the best efforts of both public and private universities to promote accelerated programs, students are sticking with the four-year college tradition. That's too bad because a three-year degree is a smart idea that we should be adopting.

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