GOOD

More than one-third of the population of the Lakewood-Browns Mill community in Atlanta lives below the poverty line, but now they'll have fresh food literally at their fingertips. What was once a food desert (a low-income area lacking access to fresh foods) is now a food forest (a public space that grows fresh produce). A plot of 7.1 acres of abandoned land has been transformed into a community garden, complete with walking trails. The community is free to pluck food from over 1,000 edible fruit and nut trees, shrubs, and vines.

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What would happen if everyone suddenly became vegetarian?

It would change our economy and our environment in drastic ways.

“What if everyone in the world was suddenly a vegetarian—what effect would it have on our lives and on the planet?”

The team over at AsapScience break this question down in a new video.

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Rural Americans’ Struggles Against Factory Farm Pollution Find Traction In Court

It’s a breakthrough after years of government failure to protect rural communities from farms housing many animals in close quarters.

A barn that can hold up to 4,800 hogs outside Berwick, Pennsylvania. The state says the farm is in compliance with regulations, but residents have gone to court seeking relief from odors. Photo by Michael Rubinkam/AP Photo.

As U.S. livestock farming becomes more industrial, it is changing rural life. Many people now live near concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) — large facilities that can house thousands of animals in close quarters. Neighbors have to contend with noxious odors, toxic emissions, and swarms of insects, and have had little success in obtaining relief — but this could be changing.

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When iRobot’s Roomba was introduced in 2002, it looked like humanity’s first step into living like The Jetsons. People couldn’t believe that for a few hundred bucks you could buy a robot that would vacuum your floors. After the Roomba’s success, its creator, Joe Jones, would invent iRobot’s Scooba, and his new start-up has just changed gardening with the Tertill.

The Tertill is essentially a Roomba that lives in gardens and automatically cuts the weeds. It’s solar-powered and relies on capacitive sensors to navigate around garden obstacles. Its sensors can also identify weeds, activating a mini weed whacker to chop them down. The Tertill is currently available on Kickstarter for $249 and will ship to supporters in May 2018.

The Tertill is part of Jones’s larger goal to create robots that can automatically weed farms without the need for dangerous herbicides. Jones believes that robot technology will eventually increase agricultural efficiency and help eliminate global food shortages as well. But for now, the Tertill is a great way for people to save their backs and knees from the rigors of bending over in the garden.


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If You’re Vegan, You Might Not Want To Handle Cash From Australia, Canada, And The U.K.

The Bank of England confirmed the reports, but don’t know how the animal product got there.

In an effort to keep up with savvy counterfeiters, the British government may have just run afoul of very unexpected subsets of citizens – vegans and animal rights activists. The Bank of England, the central bank for the United Kingdom, recently released an updated iteration of its £5 note, and along with it came the revelation that each note contains trace amounts of animal products. Specifically, the polymer used in the manufacturing of the note contains tallow, a form of rendered animal fat, most often from cows.

The Bank of England responded to a users question on Twitter, confirming the inclusion of tallow in the new notes:

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China Tells Citizens What The U.S. Won’t: Eat Less Meat

New guidelines could drastically help the environment

When the U.S. finally issued its dietary recommendations last year, the product of heavy crossfire and gnashing of teeth, one particular element stoked much anger. Despite overwhelming evidence that it would be better for people and the planet—not to mention direct pressure from doctors, NGOs and 150,000 citizens—there was no suggestion that Americans should eat less meat.

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