GOOD

A Sneak Peek Of The Pro-GMO Film Narrated By Neil deGrasse Tyson

Is it corporate propaganda or common sense? Watch this exclusive clip and decide for yourself

Image courtesy Food Evolution

Adding more fuel to the GMO versus organic food fire, the documentary “Food Evolution,” opening June 23 in NYC and expanding to additional cities in the following weeks, attempts to end the controversy once and for all with a decidedly pro-GMO argument. Directed by Academy Award-nominated director Scott Hamilton Kennedy and narrated by science celebrity Neil deGrasse Tyson, the film utilizes typical documentary conventions—featuring one-on-one interviews with specifically selected experts, beautiful shots of farmland, and a charismatic host to tie it all together.


According to the press release, the filmmakers hope to divorce emotions from supposedly hard science. Not every publication views it that way, however, with Alternet reporter Stacey Malkan eviscerating the film as a “blatant case of Monsanto corporate propaganda.” But what might be most surprising to some is deGrasse Tyson’s involvement in the documentary, seeing as he’s built such trust among his fan base as an affable and objective interpreter of complex concepts, as you can see him do in the exclusive clip below.

This wouldn’t be the first time deGrasse Tyson defended GMOs. Three years ago, deGrasse Tyson went on a YouTube rant about GMO critics, and the video ultimately received more than 1 million views. Breaking it down for viewers, he said in the video, “We have systematically genetically modified all the foods—the vegetables and animals—that we have eaten ever since we cultivated them. It’s called artificial selection. That’s how we genetically modified them. So now that we can do it in a lab, all the sudden you’re going to complain?”

Of course, there are several critics of this argument, with many pointing out that artificial selection and injecting vegetables with bacteria DNA to make them pesticide-resistant is not exactly the same thing. Though he does have a point that objecting to GMOs while gorging on giant, ultra-sweet produce—even of the “organic” variety—makes for a weak argument. Regardless, this documentary seems worth checking out if only for the sake of getting both sides, however biased either side may be. “Food Evolution” opens in New York City on June 23 and other major cities thereafter.

Food
via David Leavitt / Twitter

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