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Who Needs Drones? The Future of Delivery is Underground

Mole Solutions’ subterranean transport system begins its first pilot program

Image Courtesy of Mole Solutions

After issuing a new set of proposed rules for domestic drones in mid-February, the FAA recently granted Amazon permission to start testing their fleet of delivery drones. While some picture a near future where our skies will fill with buzzing fulfillment copters, dropping books and iPads from the heavens like so much manna, a U.K. company is bringing next-generation delivery back down to earth—or rather, beneath it. Mole Solutions’ innovative concept for transporting goods involves sending capsules full of freight through a series of underground tubes. The capsules would run on an electric track, propelled by magnetic fields like maglev trains. If successful, the idea could cut costs in a number of ways, but, most notably, the system would bypass (and maybe even help clear up) the U.K.’s stupefying traffic problem—in London alone, congestion is thought to cost the economy more than eight billion dollars every year.

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Depressing New Report Connects TV Binge Watching With Depression

Watching hour after hour of the same TV show is linked to depression, lonliness, and impulse control issues.

image via (cc) flickr user alvi2047

It’s pretty well understood that watching a lot of television probably isn’t all that good for you, but that hasn’t stopped many of us from setting up camp on the sofa to bask in the cold electric glow of the TV for hours on end. A March 2014 Nielsen report determined that the average American spends five hours a day watching live TV, with plenty more screen time spent on computers, phones, and tablets. And now, thanks to streaming services like Netflix and Amazon, we can up our TV consumption to near-limitless amounts, with whole seasons – entire series, even – at our disposal. Yes, we’ve had DVD and VHS box sets for years, but those required switching the disc or cassette every few episodes – Now we’re able to absorb an entire show without ever having to get off the couch (bladder permitting).

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Five Awesome April Fools Day Stories to Keep You Guessing

From the National Debt to colleges taken over by cats, here are five awesome April Fools Day stories we loved.


Is that headline you're reading real or is it an April Fools Day hoax? Some April Fools Day tricks are a little too obvious—bacon flavored mouthwash, we're talking to you—and then there are those stories that leave you wondering if they're real or if they're just a clever prank. Here are five of the best we found around the web:

1. One Publisher to Rule Them All:

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Who Can Profit from Selling 1-Cent Books on Amazon? Robots.

What happens when attempts to game the used book market go wrong?

What do you call a thriving marketplace of robots buying nonexistent books from other robots for millions of dollars?

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How Crowdfunding Saved 722 Square Miles of Rainforest

Ecuador will choose rainforest preservation over oil exploitation, if the rest of the world can contribute enough money to make it worthwhile.


In 2007, Rafael Correa, president of Ecuador, made an offer to the rest of the world. Underneath his country’s Yasuni National Park, one of the most biodiverse areas on the planet, lie 846 million barrels of oil valued at $7.2 billion. If the rest of the world could provide Ecuador with half that sum, Correa proposed, the oil would stay in the ground and the rainforest above it would stay intact.

By August 2010, with the help of the United Nations Development Programme, Ecuador had set up a trust fund to receive whatever funds it could raise and set a deadline of Dec. 30, 2011. If donors, both public and private, gave $100 million by that date, the project would go forward. If not, the deal was off. And by the time the deadline passed last Thursday, the world had stepped up: A suite of business people, national governments, and celebrities from Al Gore to Leonardo DiCaprio had donated $116 million, The Guardian reported. That's enough to keep 722 square miles of the park’s most valuable rainforest free from oil exploitation, at least temporarily.

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The Most Literate American Cities Are College Towns

Amazon's ranked its top 20 most well-read cities according to book sales, and college towns are winning.

Do you live in a college town? If so, chances are you're a big reader. Retail giant Amazon has announced its list of the "Top 20 Most Well-Read Cities in America." They tracked purchases of magazines, newspapers, books, and e-books since January 1 for cities with more than 100,000 residents. While Cambridge, Massachusetts, home of Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is number one, the rest of the list is dominated by big college towns.

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