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Two years after its opening in 1914, the Baltimore Museum of Art acquired a painting by Sarah Miriam Peale — its first work by a female artist. More than a century later, one might assume that the museum would have a fairly equal mix of male and female artists, right? But as of today, only 4% of the 95,000 pieces in the museum's permanent collection were created by women.

The museum is determined to narrow that gap, and they're taking a drastic step to do so.

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A Mosaic Shines in Philly

An intimate conversation with a fixture of the Philadelphia art world.

PHILADELPHIA - The South Street district is a gritty, disheveled, and jaggedly beautiful area in Philadelphia. Filled with artist’s studios, bohemian hangouts, and eclectic boutiques, South Street has long been a bastion of counterculture, a haven for those who do not fit into mainstream society and go against the grain of the status quo. Driving around this eclectic neighborhood, it is apparent that a main fixture of South Street is the glittering mosaics by artist Isaiah Zagar. Zagar’s mosaic murals, often covering entire buildings in shattered glass, ceramic, and mirror, are metaphysical windows into a world of creativity; they synthesize the history of art and the international folk art communities into a uniquely beautiful visual statement that is all at once a reflection of Zagar’s surroundings and his imagination.

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When Your Facebook Gets You As Crunked As Sugary Breakfast Cereal

An art exhibit explores our increasing addiction to being plugged in.

Humans are addicted. We are addicted to so many things, but the addiction to our phones is perhaps the worst offender. It’s hard to even drive your car without glancing down at the buzzing little perpetrator. We subject ourselves to constant stimuli, without even knowing what this dependency bodes for the future. Artist Rachel Lee Hovnanian already feels the fatigue, which she investigates with a new art exhibition, Plastic Perfect, at Leila Heller Gallery in New York.

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Thanks for the Mammaries

Inspired by her breast cancer, artist Bettina Hubby organizes an irreverent art show.

Thanks for the Mammaries installation shot. Photo by Steven Rimlinger

It’s already heartbreaking enough to be diagnosed with Stage 1 breast cancer as Los Angeles-based artist Bettina Hubby was last January. But Hubby found that the toughest thing was the dour reactions of her friends, all of whom treated Hubby’s recovery with kid gloves or, worse, pity. To break the ice, the fun-loving Hubby started a Facebook page dedicated to bosom humor.

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Satirical Cartoons Display Global Problems

Polish illustrator Pawel Kuczynski offers up his satirical cartoons of widespread problems plaguing our planet.

Courtesy Pawel Kuczynski

Polish illustrator Pawel Kuczynski needs little else in the way of inspiration for his satirical drawings than to take a look at the twisted world around him. “I like to observe people and their relationships,” he said in an interview with Fluster Magazine. “I just observe reality. I put this information in my head…and I wait for the results. In our time, it's very easy.”

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The Human Side of Spam

Spanish photographer Christina de Middel smudges fact and fiction with her staged images of Russian widows and Nigerian lawyers in distress.

When Spanish photographer and artist Cristina de Middel grew disillusioned with her work as a photojournalist—feeling that the media was too focused on pairing spectacular images and headlines rather than telling nuanced true stories—she went searching for inspiration in a peculiar place, her inbox. What emerged was “Poly-Spam,” a photo series of de Middel’s spam emails brought to life.

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