GOOD

Experts Dispute How Much Salt Is Too Much

An intellectual a-salt on federal dietary guidelines.

Image via Flickr user Dubravko Sorić

A modest Chipotle burrito contains around 2,000 milligrams of sodium. But if you live life to the fullest like I do, the sodium content of a Chipotle burrito can easily top 2,700 milligrams—or 117 percent of the daily intake suggested by current federal standards.

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Animation: The Simple Art of Being Healthy

This animation shows the contrast of diet, mental health, and physical health of two clay people.

Hayley Morris is known for her amazing stop-motion animation films. In this video, she shows the contrast of diet, mental health, and physical health on two clay people. The results make for a stylistic and enlightening video.

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Eat Scum: The Science Behind the Algae Fat Substitute Almagine, the Algae Fat Substitute

A renewable energy company found a low-fat fix where food scientists hadn’t looked—in the peculiar molecular structure of single-celled algae.


Flavor without fat is the holy grail of health food science. To compensate for trimming fat out of junk foods, chemists have tried amping up the salts and sugars. They’ve created proteins to try to mimic the smooth flavor release of fat. They’ve engineered fake fat particles so big they pass through the intestinal tract undigested. But your mouth knows what it knows: That reduced-fat Oreo tastes in no way like the full-fat version.

Now, a renewable energy company may have found a fix where food scientists hadn’t looked—in the peculiar molecular structure of single-celled algae.

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The GOOD 30-Day Challenge: Go Vegetarian

For the month of June, we're all going to try and eat less meat. Join us!

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GOOD Challenge Update: Apparently I Can't Give Up Processed Foods

I tried to not eat industrially processed food for a month. I failed. Should I blame poor planning, kakonomics, or faux-nostalgic Culinary Luddites?

Way back in the early days of February, I made a pledge: to give up industrially processed food for a month. The idea behind my pledge, and my colleague Cord's earlier renunciation of soap, was to see whether these individual lifestyle tweaks can create positive change—in our own well-being, in our communities, and in the world around us.

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Feeding the Tiny Humans of the Future: Amsterdam's Disproportionate Restaurant

A new restaurant explores the way genetically-engineered one-and-a-half foot tall humans might cook, eat, and farm.


Since the dawn of space travel, scientists have approached the problem of human survival in such a hostile environment from two opposing angles: adapting the environment to humans, or vice-versa. The former approach has provided most of the solutions so far: spacesuits and spaceships shield humans from extreme temperatures and radiation, and one day, greenhouses may allow earth's crops to grow on Mars.

But, out on the fringes, big thinkers such as Manfred Clynes, who coined the word cyborg more than 50 years ago, and Craig Ventner, famous for sequencing the human genome, have wondered whether it might not be more effective to just re-design humans—using drugs, technology, and, most recently, genetic engineering—so that we can survive in space.

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