GOOD

Exploring the Alphabet With LSD and ABCs

Forget everything you knew about letters in this brilliant alphabet animation.

W is for Whoop; B is for Boring; D is for Dim Sum. So says the brilliant new animation "LSD ABC's," created by Laura Sicouri and Kadavre Exquis.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

"Wat up wit u": Yep, Texting Is Killing Students' Grammar Skills

Researchers find that the more students text, the more they see texting shortcuts as normal.


"Wat up wit u mom I luv u" says the most recent text from my 11-year-old son. His shorthand, of course, translates to, "What’s up with you, mom? I love you." Like many of us when we text, he isn't taking the time to type out the whole sentence. Every day he and his tween peers zip a dozen similar shorthand text messages back and forth to each other. According to a new study in the journal New Media and Society, the use of these ubiquitous texting shortcuts is negatively altering their ability to identify and use correct grammar.

Researchers gave grammar tests to sixth through eighth graders in Pennsylvania and asked them for information on their texting habits. After crunching the test and texting data they found that the more texts the 10-to-14-year-olds sent, the worse their grammar performance. The problem is the students begin to see their textual adaptations as normal and so have a tough time code switching to more formal way of writing.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

How to Break the Cycle of Remedial College Classes

At least a third of college students start freshman year in remedial classes. A California project shows that it doesn't have to be that way.


This month, more than half of community college freshmen and at least a third of university students started college already behind. They're in at least one remedial course that does not count toward a degree, thus beginning at least four months—and sometimes years—delayed in getting the degree they enrolled to earn.

This colossal disappointment is largely avoidable. Students need not toil in remedial courses that cost precious time and money.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

The State of Summer School: Teens Are Hitting the Books Year-Round

Top high school students are feeling the pressure to get into the best colleges, so they're signing up for summer school. Willingly.

When I was in high school I spent my summers letting my nerd flag fly high by doing things like sitting around reading The Count of Monte Cristo—all 1,312 pages of it—in one day. My peers hit up the pool or roamed the mall, but none of us ever considered going to summer school. For my generation, summer school was where the "bad" kids who ditched class to smoke weed in the parking lot went so they could still graduate on time. But nowadays if you live in a city where summer school hasn't been eliminated due to district budget cuts, chances are that the honors and AP crowd is more likely to spend June, July, and part of August waking up early and schlepping backpacks to campus—and it's all driven by the desire to get into a top college.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Studying on the Second Shift: Midnight College Classes

Perfect for night owls and working adults. Boston's Bunker Hill Community College offers classes that start at 11:45 p.m.

\n\n\n\n\n One of the hard parts about going to college as an adult is that class schedules aren't aligned with work schedules. You can't take a 2 p.m. math class if you work a nine-to-five job. And, if you're a working parent, taking a 6 p.m. class is also an impossibility since by the time you fight your way through traffic to pick up your kids at daycare, get them home, feed them, check their homework and then put them to bed, it's 9 or 10 p.m. But Bunker Hill Community College in Boston has a smart solution. They offer classes that start at 9 p.m., and if that's not late enough, they also have ones that begin at 11:45 p.m. and end at 2:30 a.m. the next day.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Hundreds of Los Angeles Students Walk Out Over Plan to Fire Teachers

Despite a 26 percent dropout rate, students at Huntington Park High School are against a school turnaround plan.


Los Angeles' Huntington Park High School may have a 26 percent dropout rate, but students there protested on Tuesday over a decision to replace at least half of teachers and other campus employees as part of an aggressive school turnaround plan. Despite student opposition, the plan was unanimously approved by the Los Angeles Unified School District board.

One walkout participant told the Los Angeles Times that approximately 300 student protesters gathered in a central area and refused to go to a 10 a.m. class. They then marched seven miles to the district headquarters in Downtown Los Angeles. Another participant named Joey said that students are angry over "both the dismantling of the school and exception that is being made for Libra Academy, a new small school on the edge of campus." Libra's test scores are higher, which is why it's being exempted from the plan, but students "find it very unfair that the adjoined school Libra with its hand-picked higher-achieving students will not be affected by the change."

Keep Reading Show less
Articles