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While commuting via bicycle is healthy for humans and the environment, riding through city streets can feel intimidating and downright dangerous. Ford is trying to create a future where there is are fewer accidents and safer cyclists.

Image via Ford Media

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State of the Unions: Organized Labor Has Seen Much Better Days

Lest we forget why we've got a three-day weekend, Labor Day is a recognition of American workers and what they've done for all of us.

Lest we forget why we've got a three-day weekend, Labor Day is a recognition of American workers and what they've done for the country. Minyanville writes that the labor movement has seen significant decline in recent years, and checks in on a few specific labor unions. Here's an excerpt from the section on public sector workers:

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What's Killing the Electric Car? The Price of Batteries

Ford's new EV is impressive, but like other automakers, it's facing a real barrier in battery technology.

At last week's Electric Vehicle Symposium in Los Angeles, a consortium of automakers from the United States and Europe unveiled a speedy new standardized charger for electric vehicles.

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Is Your City Ready for Electric Cars?

Ford has declared these 25 cities to be best prepared for electric vehicles (but it isn't a perfect analysis).


This is Ford's map of the cities best prepared for electric cars. As our old friend Morgan Clendaniel reports:

Cities that ranked high on their list did so by making it easier to obtain permits for home charging stations, working with utility companies to set up cheaper rates during the night (when people will charge), and using an "urban planning approach to public charge station locations—meaning that they look at traffic flows and where people spend their parked time to determine charging locations."

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Ecovative Design Partners with Ford to Develop Mushroom-Based Car Parts

Your next car might have fungus-based, biodegradable car bumpers, doors, and dashboards.


Mushrooms. They're great for pasta sauce, vision quests, and... car parts? Maybe. Ecovative Design, a Green Island, New York-based start-up, just announced a deal with Ford to develop a fungus-based, biodegradable material to be used for car bumpers, doors, and dashboards.

Ecovative Design has been developing mushroom-based materials since its founding in 2007. It uses the fungus root structures called mycelium to bind agricultural by-products such as corn and oat husks together. The result is a solid, foam-like material that the company has already marketed for packaging (the furniture company Steelcase is Ecovative's biggest client) and home insulation.

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