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Teacher’s Little Reading Helper

Know any child iPad addicts who should be learning how to read instead of playing Candy Crush? Try Bam Boomerang

In trying to create a children’s reading app, engineer Keenan Wyrobek discovered he had a feedback problem. More specifically, he learned that teachers frequently didn’t have time to give individual attention to students as they practiced reading aloud. “As a teacher with 20, 30 kids, I only listen to each kid once a week—best-case scenario,” one educator informed Wyrobek. He decided that’s what would make his app, Bam Boomerang, different.

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The New iPad May Be a Snooze, But It's Showing the Way to Free-Range Computing

Apple's latest gadget show-and-tell was a bit of a flop, but it's bringing us a new kind of personal computing.



Maybe Apple should host its big press confabs a little less frequently. Fanboys aside, most of us don’t need to know much about the new iPad that Apple CEO Tim Cook unveiled yesterday—other than a nicer display, it's not that much different than the last one. Tellingly, the biggest controversy arising from the roadshow wasn’t any of the device’s features but its moniker—it’s just "the new iPad," not the expected iPad HD or iPad3. Stop the presses!

On the other hand, Cook’s attempt to offer up a compelling vision of our electronic future—the kind of magic that his predecessor, the late Steve Jobs, used to produce on occasions like these—is notable. As Cook described it, Apple is poised to dominate our “post-PC future” with a bevvy of devices, like the iPad and the iPhone, that aren’t tethered to any physical location and access applications and data from the cloud.

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Will Apple's iBooks Experiment Lower the Price of College Textbooks?

If Apple becomes the iTunes of the digital textbook world, will college students be able to save some cash?


With schools investing millions toward MacBooks and iPads for every student, Apple is already a major player in the education-technology market. But Thursday's announcement of a slew of new education apps made clear that the company is positioning itself to become the iTunes of the digital textbook world.

Apple executives announced details of a revamped iTunesU, the new iAuthor app—which will allow educators to create their own books—and iBooks2, a partnership with the nation's biggest education publishers. iBooks will produce electronic texts for K-12 schools starting at the uber-affordable price of $14.99 each.

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Downloading College Textbook Chapters Could Make College More Affordable

Only need to read two chapters in the $90 textbook? What if you could download each for $3.99?

The first quarter of my freshman year of college, I bought every book my professors listed as required reading—and it cost me over $800. A few weeks into classes, like many of my peers, I was dismayed to discover that despite spending all that money on entire texts, professors often only assigned two or three chapters from each book. That problem hasn't gone away. Students are still routinely expected to buy entire college textbooks that they only need a portion of. But now publishers are proposing an intriguing solution, and they're looking at iTunes as a model.

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San Diego Is Bridging the Digital Divide with Refurbished Computers for Low-Income Families

Trying to do research for an assignment or type a paper without your own computer is really hard.

Can you imagine trying to do research for an assignment or type a paper without your own computer? For low-income students, this is often the reality. Sure, they can sometimes trek to public libraries to use computers there, but with long waits, time-use limits, and libraries cutting back their hours, more kids are left without a way to complete critical schoolwork. The San Diego County Office of Education's "Unlimited Access" program, a collaborative effort with businesses and nonprofits, may have a solution.

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An iPad Case for Your Inner Book Nerd

Pad & Quill's line of cases for e-readers have the look, feel, and even pleasantly musty smell of your favorite leather-bound classic edition book.


While you've embraced all the high-tech innovation and convenience of e-readers, that doesn't mean you have to surrender all of your book-loving sensibilities to modern technology. Take heart, classic book lovers: Minnesota-based Pad & Quill will give your e-reader a vintage spin that even a librarian will love. Their line of cases for the Nook, Kindle, iPhone, or iPad (their iPad 2 cases start shipping this Friday and even have a punched-out hole for the camera lens) have the look, feel, and even pleasantly musty smell of your favorite leather-bound classic edition book, because they're made in the same fashion.

Using traditional bookbinding techniques, artisans fit together the leather covers and cloth liners and use finished Baltic birch to create the "pages" that frame the iPad securely in place.

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