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YouTube Kids App Under Fire for Advertising to Kids

Several interest groups have banded together to encourage the FTC to better regulate digital marketing targeting children.

Image via YouTube screencapture

For decades, the Federal Trade Commission has been regulating television advertising with special attention to anything perceived to target the vulnerable minds of America’s youth. Now, consumer groups are advocating the same scrutiny be given to digital advertising, and Google’s new app YouTube Kids is feeling the heat.

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Darwin’s Kids Doodled All Over His Original Manuscript

How the naturalist’s scribbling children accidentally saved a priceless historical artifact

On a page from Charles Darwin’s original manuscript of On the Origin of Species, two mounted swordsmen face off—one’s steed a mighty galloping carrot while the other, wearing a plumed yellow turban, approaches on a menacing-looking, four-legged eggplant. No, this isn’t an early, discarded theory, in which the English naturalist hypothesized a vegetable origin for equine life, but instead, a series of doodles created by his children on the backs of his handwritten manuscript pages. After the book’s publication, Darwin gave his kids these pages, covered on one side with the notes and scrawls that would eventually become one of the most influential scientific works in history, as drawing paper. And it’s a good thing he did; out of the almost 600 pages of Darwin’s original work, only 45 remain and at least four of these are likely to have been preserved only as sentimental mementos of his progeny’s childhood fancies.

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Inside the Minds of 11-Year Olds From Around the World

A new documentary probes the special moral clarity of 11-year old children.

Goh, from the film I am Eleven. Photo By Henrik Nordstrom

I Am Eleven, a new documentary by Australian filmmaker Genevieve Bailey, takes us through six years and 15 countries and into the minds of the world’s 11-year-old kids. Somewhere in between childhood wonder and teenage angst, the film’s young subjects, described by the filmmaker as full of “hope, a clarity of expression, and openness,” talk about subjects like global warming and poverty with the kind of earnestness that only children exhibit. The film, in limited release in New York and San Francisco this month, provides unique, vivid, and at times heartbreaking insight into the effects of racial segregation and economic disparity.

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Dealbreaker: She Wanted Kids

I feel I’m doing our crippled economy a favor by shooting for zero offspring. She wanted four.


In our Dealbreakers series, exes report on the habit, belief, or boxer brief that ended the affair.

“Relationships are very simple,” Chris Rock says in Rock This! “Only two things can happen: You get married or you break up. That’s it. There’s no third thing.”

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The Raffi of Food Allergies: Inside the Allergic-Kid Economy

Kyle Dine sings songs for kids who hate nuts. And as more and more American kids develop food allergies, his fan base is only getting bigger.



As a kid, Kyle Dine was introduced to a long menu of foods he wasn’t allowed to eat: tree nuts, peanuts, eggs, turmeric, mustard, shellfish, salmon. But Dine was determined not to let his food allergies get in his way. That didn’t always turn out so well: He took risks and didn’t read labels. When he was 21, a relative handed him a dessert square and told him it was egg-free. Within two minutes, Dine felt his throat closing up—the dessert contained cashews. He alerted his mother, who injected him with his EpiPen and called 911. He spent the night swollen in the hospital, hooked up to an IV that pumped his body full of antihistamines.

“It was a very close call,” Dine says. “It was definitely a very shocking experience for me.” Today, Dine has reinvented himself as the Raffi of food allergies. A couple years after his dessert square scare, Dine was teaching guitar at an Ontario summer camp when he met a group of kids who all happened to be allergic to peanuts. The group broke into an ad lib song with the refrain, “We Hate Nuts!” Dine now performs a version of that song—and other allergy-themed ditties, like “My Epineph Friend” and “Food Allergies Rock”—for groups of children from Toronto to Texas.

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The Future Is Lonely: Why I'm Only Having One Kid

Being an only child kinda sucked. But there’s no doubt that my future child will be one.


Me in 1985, dreaming up my imaginary little sister

I wasn’t exactly devastated that I grew up an only child, but I didn’t love it. In fact, it kinda sucked. I begged my parents for a sibling weekly until I was about 8. Instead of an imaginary friend, I had an imaginary younger sister, much to the confusion of my kindergarten teacher. There are only so many times your parents will play catch with you, and only so far your creativity can take you before you whine, “I’m bo-ored!”

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