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Artist Rents Billboards to Beautify Busy Commutes

Drivers lucky enough to pass Brian Kane’s “Healing Tool” displays were treated to an eyeful of art, instead of ads.

image via briankane.net

Our commutes, whether by car, bike, train, or foot, are peppered with signs and ads, each hocking a product or service in as eye-catching (and therefore: disruptive) a way as possible, all to snag your precious attention and—if successful—your even *more* precious money. Recently, however, drivers on several Massachusetts highways may have noticed a number of roadside billboards suddenly transformed from advertisements into something much more welcome: Soothing scenes of nature.

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'Climate Cliff' Foe Is Likely Massachusetts Senate Candidate

With John Kerry all but certain to be the next Secretary of State, a new Senate race in Massachusetts is gearing up.

I know you. I know your vice—it's politics. You're addicted and now that the presidential election is long-gone (remember that?) and we're in a little gap between scary Congressionally constructed crises, you need a fix.

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Massachusetts Shows the Way to Saving on Electricity Costs

Greater energy efficiency means more money to spend on health care, education, and basics like groceries. And Massachusetts is leading the way.


It’s a rare day when California is not the top-ranked state on some environmental ranking list. The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy has measured states’ energy efficiency efforts five times now, putting California on top four times. In the group’s latest report [PDF], however, Massachusetts pulled out a surprise win.

Massachusetts out-greened the perennial champion with foresight and legislation. Three years ago, the state passed the Green Communities Act, which made major efficiency commitments. The law doubled the requirements for utilities' renewable energy purchases. It mandated that utilities invest in efficiency improvements when they cost less than generating more power and committed to adopt stricter building codes. It made it easier for owners of solar panels and wind turbines to sell power back to the grid. And it created rebates and other incentives for households and businesses to upgrade their lighting and heating and cooling systems.

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16-Year-Old Girl Challenges Michele Bachmann to a Civics Debate

Maybe civics education isn't dead after all.

Ready for a one-question civics pop quiz? How many amendments are there to the United States Constitution? If you're feeling a little overwhelmed by the question, you're not alone. The average American student is pretty ignorant when it comes to civics. Data released this month from the National Assessment of Educational Progress showed three-quarters of seniors can't name a power granted to Congress by the Constitution.

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