GOOD

How the Government Is Lowballing Investments in Clean Energy

The government could shut down over $1.6 billion in cuts to clean energy, part of a broader reluctance to fund clean energy.


The federal government could shut down over $1.6 billion in cuts to clean-energy programs. Most of the proposed cuts come from a fuel efficiency program, but House Republicans also targeted the loan program that backed Solyndra, the dysfunction solar company that’s cast dispersion over the rest of the industry. Congress didn’t need Solyndra to give it an excuse to slash funding for the clean-energy industry, though. This latest hit only underlines the government’s lack of enthusiasm for any energy project involving the words “clean” or “renewable."

Take, for example, the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy. Inspired by the innovation-driving, internet-creating Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, ARPA-E invests in game-changing energy technology, like electric-vehicle batteries that could lower the cost of driving from St. Louis to Chicago to less than $5. Independent organizations, both liberal and conservative, have recommended the agency receive funding on the order of $1 billion. Yet the Obama administration's funding proposals have come in far lower than that, and Congress has low-balled the agency further. In March, Arun Majumdar, who heads ARPA-E, requested $650 million for the 2012 fiscal year. The House's version of the energy appropriations bill allocated $180 million to the organization.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Who Needs Nukes? Japan Plans a Massive Shift to Solar Power

Japanese officials are set to unveil a new "Sunrise Plan" tomorrow, requiring all new buildings to be covered by solar panels by 2030.

The Japanese public is less enthusiastic about nuclear power these days. Responding to the Fukushima crisis and public concerns earlier this month, Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan declared the nation's plans for nuclear power expansion officially dead.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

On the 25th Anniversary of Chernobyl, Greenpeace Freaks Us Out About Indian Point

Watch this wildly, unapologetically sensational anti-nuke video from Greenpeace.

On the 25th anniversary of the Chernobyl, I present to you (without endorsement or critique) this wildly, unapologetically sensational Greenpeace video about the potential threat posed by the Indian Point reactor, which sits a mere 30 or so miles north of New York City. As the video notes, 17 million people live within 50 miles of Indian Point.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j3oROy0xg2A

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Slideshow: America's Ten Riskiest Nuclear Reactors

The Nuclear Regulatory Commissions calculated the odds of an earthquake damaging the core of every reactor in the country. Here are the ten riskiest.

The odds listed were generated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and reflect the chances of an earthquake causing damage to each reactor's core. The odds take into consideration two main factors: the chance of a serious quake, and the strength of design of the plant. They also factor the changes in USGS data from 1989 to 2008.

Keep Reading Show less
Slideshows

Is Nuclear Safer Than Coal?

Nuclear accidents and all, coal is our deadliest energy source. Energy expert Jesse Jenkins and our publisher discuss on the Dylan Ratigan Show.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Eating Inside the Eden of Chernobyl's Exclusion Zone

Is it safe to eat the fruits and berries growing on land contaminated 25 years ago by a nuclear disaster? Looking forward by looking back.

Japan is just now beginning to see the food chain trauma from nuclear radiation around the damaged Fukushima plant. While the radiation may disperse in the vast Pacific Ocean, rather than pooling on land and in food crops, it's worth revisiting the food growing around one the 20th century's worst nuclear disaster—the exclusion zone around Chernobyl.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles