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Being a server in a restaurant is hard work. You're on your feet all day, you have to deal with needy customers, and the pay can be downright terrible. In fact, most U.S. states permit employers to pay tipped workers less than the federal minimum wage. In 21 states, servers are paid only $2.13 an hour before tips. According to a report in The Wall Street Journal, “nearly 15% of the nation's 2.4 million waiters and waitresses live in poverty, compared with about 7% of all workers. They are more likely to need public assistance and less likely to receive paid sick leave or health benefits."

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Lifestyle

Librarians are sounding off on annoying customers and it’s awesome hearing them vent.

There’s a specific type of customer that makes them nuts.

via Brennan / Twitter

Customer service jobs always come with headaches. Servers complain about picky customers or those who don’t tip. Salespeople get frustrated by looky-loos who take up all their time and don’t buy anything.

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Articles

A lot of people have bosses who are jerks, and who snipe at them for any and every oversight. On the other hand, some people can really try their boss’ patience, with constant lateness and errors. But here’s an example of the perfect relationship: an excellent employee and a really cool boss.

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Articles

6 College Essay Questions That Employers Should Steal

Job interviews often rely on a dull script. These creative application prompts could tell companies what they really want to know.

Illustration by Tyler Hoehne

As those hoping to be accepted to the class of 2019 can tell you, there’s not a lot to recommend about the college admission process, which now includes anything from a YouTube vlog to an itemized list of extracurriculars, and, of course, standardized test scores.

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Money

Forget Leaning In, It’s Time For Women To Push Back

Good news: You’re the boss. Bad news: You’re the boss

My promotion was cause for celebration for everyone but me. Friends clinked glasses at happy hour, and though I smiled over martinis, I felt dread. I’d worked so hard for my new title, but I already crammed my art into the nooks and crannies of the occasional free evening. For a (very) mild pay raise and resume-fattening responsibility, I’d be giving up more time and energy to do work that frankly bored me. Saying so aloud seemed like spitting on my privilege.

Only one person in my life understood my ambivalence: my father. The first in his family to go to college and land a gig that required pressed shirts and briefcases, he’s prone to waxing nostalgic about his college construction job, the one he took to pay off the tuition that was supposed to give him a “better” life. Laying bricks left his body sore and his mind unfettered; he missed knowing that when he put his hammer down for the day, his life was his own.

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Money

Your Dream Job Is A Lie

Forget being tethered to one job for the rest of your life. You have options.

It’s time to let go of the fantasy that there’s a “one and only” dream job waiting for you—the career soulmate to provide you with 35 years of self-fulfilled bliss and full dental care. That position doesn’t exist for most, according to a recent Gallup poll, which found millennials to be the least engaged generation at work. Nearly 30 percent admitted that they lacked “the opportunity to do what they do best.”

Findings like this paint a bleak picture of the millennial’s place in today’s workforce. But before you resign yourself to decades of 9-to-5 drudgery, consider that the lack of a single career actually means the possibilities are endless. To take advantage of as many opportunities as possible, think about leaving a job sooner rather than later. You wouldn’t be alone. In 2014, the median amount of time that workers had spent with their current employer was 4.6 years. Among ages 25 to 34, however, that timeframe drops to three years. There’s no stigma about having four different employers on your resume over a decade. Your future boss (if you choose to even have one) may appreciate your ability to adapt and embrace fresh challenges. Give yourself 18 months to two years at each job if you must, but don’t feel obligated beyond that. New beginnings can be your new normal.

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Money