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Education: Morning Roundup

Morning Roundup:\r\n\r\nFrom The New York Times: ‘Yes' to Pop-Tarts! Panel Approves Bake-Sale Rules\r\nThe Panel for...


Morning Roundup:


From The New York Times: ‘Yes' to Pop-Tarts! Panel Approves Bake-Sale Rules
The Panel for Educational Policy voted unanimously to implement a policy that bans most bake sales but allows students to sell premade items including Pop-Tarts and Doritos.

From the Los Angeles Times: The charter school test case that didn't happen
If they hadn't been mostly shut out of bids to run a slew of new L.A. Unified campuses, the groups might have demonstrated how they handle students with challenging needs.

From The Washington Post: Business principles won't work for school reform, former supporter Ravitch says
Diane Ravitch, a one-time proponent of the value of standardized test data switches sides. "Is Arne Duncan really Margaret Spellings in drag?" Ravitch asked in a February 2009 blog item, suggesting that the education secretary's policies are not much different from those espoused by Spellings, who held the office under President George W. Bush.

From the Boston Globe: Teachers in mass firing plan to appeal dismissal
The entire staff of teachers fired in a radical attempt to improve one of the worst performing high schools in Rhode Island will appeal their dismissals to school authorities, the head of the teachers union said yesterday.

Photo (cc) via Flickr user themexican.

Articles
via Barry Schapiro / Twitter

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